Frederick County Sheriff Chuck Jenkins was surprised Thursday night when his patrol operations commander, Capt. Ron Hibbard, emailed him an article about the approval of a new medical marijuana dispensary in Frederick.

“I was surprised that we had not received word it was going to be permitted down there,” Jenkins said. “I guess it had been moved along faster than I thought.”

In response, Hibbard and Jenkins drove to the Wellness Institute of Maryland on Friday morning to pay a visit. Initially, Jenkins said, he just planned to take a look at the building and scope out the location. But when he saw that journalists were speaking to the owners of the new dispensary — the first to be licensed in the state — he decided to get out and say hello.

What resulted was a cordial visit with Mike Kline and Ron Diggs, two of the company’s founders, and a quick tour of the dispensary. While Jenkins didn’t stay long, he said, he and Hibbard were reassured by the security measures in place.

“I am confident now that it’s going to be very heavily secured,” Jenkins said. “I was also relieved to find out there was going to be very little inventory stored at the dispensary itself. It’s a better scenario than I thought.”

For Jenkins, the opening of the dispensary, which won’t start selling products until after Labor Day, was a strange reminder that marijuana — a drug he spent much of his early career combating — had been partially legalized in his home state. Maryland approved the use of medical marijuana in 2012, and legislators are now slowly implementing a state-run cannabis program.

While Jenkins accepts that more dispensaries will likely be licensed in Frederick County, he’s still personally opposed to the use of medical cannabis, he said. And while his security concerns were somewhat alleviated by his visit, the legalization of medical cannabis still presents a conundrum for law enforcement.

“Dispensaries could still be a target for some kind of criminal act,” Jenkins said. “And then it presents a whole different set of problems. What do we do if we pull over someone with medical cannabis and they don’t have a prescription with them? If we stop a vehicle coming from one of these facilities, how do we determine it’s legitimate?”

Kline, meanwhile, is also working to alleviate concerns on the part of law enforcement. The dispensary is fitted with a modern security monitoring system and patients are required to make an appointment before coming to the dispensary, he said, eliminating the potential for walk-in traffic.

While the business is cash only — due largely to a shortage of banks willing to do business with medical marijuana dispensaries — Kline also doubts the company’s inventory would have much value on the streets. Only a small amount of “flower” — the industry term for marijuana buds — will be available at the dispensary. Most cannabis will be available as pills, oils, topical lotions or patches, and many products are specifically designed to lack hallucinogenic properties.

“The Maryland model is very medical,” said Arnold Honkofsky, the clinical director and licensed pharmacist for the dispensary. “We’re only facilitating another modality of treatment that could help make patients more comfortable.”

Jenkins might not agree with medical cannabis, but he is open to hearing more from the dispensary’s owners. During the visit, they discussed the possibility of sitting down and having a larger conversation, he said. In the future, Jenkins’ main concern is getting notice that a dispensary is about to open.

“We just want to be proactive,” he said. “I felt like when it came out in the paper, it surprised everyone, so it’s about being more aware moving forward.”

Follow Kate Masters on Twitter: @kamamasters.

Kate Masters is the features and food reporter for The Frederick News-Post. She can be reached at kmasters@newspost.com.

(66) comments

KellyAlzan

Message to Dick - hey, not all of us are retired. Many of us are very involved with our family, and life.

Thanks for all the posts, but who on earth has time to read them???

DickD

Kelly, you probably post more than I do and today is Saturday, so what does retirement have to do with it?

KellyAlzan

You're so slow. In other words, no one has the free time that you have.

armillary

KellyAlzan, you frequently dominate the comments section of articles concerning political, legal, land use and immigration issues. It's nice to see when DickD holds as strong an opinion as you on some issues. Can't someone else go overboard occasionally on a subject the way you so frequently do?

DickD

Kelly, I will just have to speed up and give you more. Thank you for pointing this out. [rolleyes]

shiftless88

I think it's fine that you post these things, Dick, but they make no difference. Marijuana has some strong points and some weak points as a drug, just like most drugs. Hell, the harm that it does is far outweighed by alcohol and probably no worse than a big mac and fries. It is not without some downsides, but that isn't a reason to not allow it. You sound like those conservatives who hate relations with Cuba presumably because of their poor human rights record but have no problems with relations with other countries that have a far worse human rights record.

rbtdt5

Dick is one of the funniest posters here. He says he's middle of the road, and I believe that but he would never vote for an R even when they think like him. He likes to research and try to educate himself on topic but only finds things he agrees with. Ever Since they blocked Bluedawn (c larson) he has been my favorite poster as he has become the new whack-a doo

DickD

And you want to outdo me, Rabbit. Go ahead, no problem and you are bound to win the top trophy for Whack a do's.

Jleftwich

Huh? Jenkins is surprised?! It was in the news!! In this very paper!

April, 2017: Patients can now begin to enroll for medical marijuana in Maryland

"Four dispensaries and two growers have received pre-approval to operate in Frederick County and are currently working through the second stage of the commission’s approval process, which includes undergoing criminal background investigations, securing local zoning approvals and constructing facilities."

https://www.fredericknewspost.com/news/health/patients-can-now-begin-to-enroll-for-medical-marijuana-in/article_6be20e7f-6081-5a99-be6e-1ca26281fe48.html

DickD

http://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/news/20000320/regular-marijuana-emphysema#1

March 20, 2000 (Baltimore) -- Chronic marijuana smoking may lead to emphysema, a serious disorder in which areas of lung tissue are destroyed and replaced with cysts, according to a paper published in this month's issue of the journal Thorax.

In the paper, Martin Johnson, MD, of the department of respiratory medicine at Glasgow (Scotland) Royal Infirmary, and colleagues discuss the cases of four men who regularly smoked marijuana but did not smoke much tobacco, and who developed emphysema in the upper areas of their lungs. "Our cases are of particular interest, not just because of their young age, but also because of the unusual pattern of emphysema and the relatively low level of exposure to tobacco smoke compared with that more commonly associated with emphysema," Johnson writes.

The men ranged in age from 27 to 46. The 27-year-old had smoked several pipes full of marijuana daily for several years, while the other men smoked from two joints per week to three per day. Tobacco use, which is commonly associated with the development of lung cancer and emphysema, was minimal among all three men. All of them developed the cysts, called bullae, in the upper areas of their lungs, but not in the middle or lower areas.

The researchers were unable to show that marijuana smoking is a cause of emphysema, but demonstrated that it may play an additive role in the development of bullae. "There is a public perception that marijuana smoking has little adverse effect on physical health. ... We hope that our case reports will stimulate further study into ... potential lung toxicity," Johnson writes.

Jag Khalsa, PhD, a neuropharmacologist with the Center on AIDS and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, reviewed the paper for WebMD. "There have been anecdotal reports of the development of these kinds of conditions in chronic marijuana users, and I'm not surprised by these findings," he says. "The idea that people who smoke marijuana don't smoke as much as those who smoke cigarettes and are therefore not at risk of health consequences is erroneous." Because pot smokers try to keep the smoke in their lungs longer, and because marijuana is smoked unfiltered, a few joints may be as harmful as a much larger number of tobacco cigarettes, he says.

In an interview with WebMD, Christopher Gallagher, MD, clinical assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center, says: "In our clinic we have encountered several young marijuana smokers with no history of tobacco smoking or other significant risk factors who were diagnosed withlung cancer or other ... cancers. It's certainly reasonable to suspect there could be an association with the development of emphysema." Though more study is needed, he says, "for the recreational user with a full life expectancy, the potentially harmful effects of marijuana smoking are a legitimate concern."

DickD

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/12/31/marijuana-dui_n_4520129.html

Marijuana DUI Laws in Maryland
Very recently Maryland decriminalized the possession of small amounts of marijuana. That is possession under ten grams. Even though marijuana is decriminalized, it does not mean that driving under the influence of marijuana is acceptable. Being impaired by marijuana and operating a motor vehicle is still a violation of § 21-902 (d). Penalties for that are the same as when there is impairment by cocaine, heroin, or any other kinds of illegal drugs. Even though Maryland decriminalized the possession of marijuana, they have not decriminalized driving under the influence of the drug.

The maximum penalty for a first offense violation of § 21-902 (d) is same as an alcohol DUI that is one year of incarceration, $1,000 fine and 12 points on the person’s driver’s license.

DickD

Marijuana can show up in the blood stream for as long as three months for heavy users.

http://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/marijuana-use-and-its-effects#1

Marijuana side effects on the body, physiological, mental
Short-term marijuana side effects include memory and learning problems, distorted perception, and difficulty thinking and solving problems. Many people notice euphoria, relaxation, a sense of wellbeing, sleepiness, increased appetite, and better music appreciation. Others may not like the effects and could experience unpleasant thoughts and paranoid feelings.
Long term side effects of heavy and regular marijuana use include lung disease, chronic cough, mucus, nasal congestion, lack of motivation, decrease in sexual desire, a few extra pounds, and potentially various typescancer. However, one study listed below shows no link between marijuana smoking and lung cancer. Heavy and regular consumption of marijuana triggers psychosis and schizophrenia in a small number of people. MRI tests show patients given the active cannabis compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have reduced function in the inferior frontal cortex brain region. This area is associated with controlling inappropriate emotional and behavioral responses to situations.

Anxiety and panic attacks can occur in some users, and in infrequent cases cannabis may trigger schizophrenia in those who were perhaps genetically predisposed to this mental condition.

People who smoke marijuana are much more likely to have paranoia than people who don't use the drug. A July 2014 study identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people exposed to the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, THC. The team of researchers, led by Professor Daniel Freeman, PHD, of the University of Oxford, found that worrying, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and having a range of unsettling changes in perceptions most likely lead to the feelings of paranoia. Freeman, D. Schizophrenia Bulletin, published online July 15, 2014.Daniel Freeman, PhD, professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

Smoking especially strong pot — or skunk — may damage nerve fibers responsible for sending and receiving messages in the brain. Researchers in Italy and the U.K. in 2015 found a bigger effect on the corpus callosum in people who smoked high-potency cannabis than people who smoked marijuana with lower levels of THC or those didn't smoke at all. This could lead to a higher rate of psychosis.

Men who were heavy pot smokers in their teens may not live as long as those who did not use marijuana when they were young.

DickD

It is the Sheriff's job to stop anyone under the influence of drugs, including marijuana - medical or not!
http://www.criminaldefenselawyer.com/marijuana-laws-and-penalties/dui/maryland.htm

under the influence of marijuana is a crime in Maryland. This article explains the penalties imposed for DUI violations, but other laws regarding marijuana possession may also apply to drivers and passengers. Also, while Maryland allows medical marijuana use under limited circumstances, it is still a crime to drive after such use if the driver’s mental or physical faculties are impaired.

DickD

http://www.webmd.com/lung/copd/news/20000320/regular-marijuana-emphysema#1

March 20, 2000 (Baltimore) -- Chronic marijuana smoking may lead toemphysema, a serious disorder in which areas of lung tissue are destroyed and replaced with cysts, according to a paper published in this month's issue of the journal Thorax.

In the paper, Martin Johnson, MD, of the department of respiratory medicine at Glasgow (Scotland) Royal Infirmary, and colleagues discuss the cases of four men who regularly smoked marijuana but did not smoke much tobacco, and who developed emphysema in the upper areas of their lungs. "Our cases are of particular interest, not just because of their young age, but also because of the unusual pattern of emphysema and the relatively low level of exposure to tobacco smoke compared with that more commonly associated with emphysema," Johnson writes.

The men ranged in age from 27 to 46. The 27-year-old had smoked several pipes full of marijuana daily for several years, while the other men smoked from two joints per week to three per day. Tobacco use, which is commonly associated with the development of lung cancer and emphysema, was minimal among all three men. All of them developed the cysts, called bullae, in the upper areas of their lungs, but not in the middle or lower areas.

The researchers were unable to show that marijuana smoking is a cause of emphysema, but demonstrated that it may play an additive role in the development of bullae. "There is a public perception that marijuana smoking has little adverse effect on physical health. ... We hope that our case reports will stimulate further study into ... potential lung toxicity," Johnson writes.

Jag Khalsa, PhD, a neuropharmacologist with the Center on AIDS and Medical Consequences of Drug Abuse with the National Institute on Drug Abuse, reviewed the paper for WebMD. "There have been anecdotal reports of the development of these kinds of conditions in chronic marijuana users, and I'm not surprised by these findings," he says. "The idea that people who smoke marijuana don't smoke as much as those who smoke cigarettes and are therefore not at risk of health consequences is erroneous." Because pot smokers try to keep the smoke in their lungs longer, and because marijuana is smoked unfiltered, a few joints may be as harmful as a much larger number of tobacco cigarettes, he says.

In an interview with WebMD, Christopher Gallagher, MD, clinical assistant professor at the University of Pennsylvania Cancer Center, says: "In our clinic we have encountered several young marijuana smokers with no history of tobacco smoking or other significant risk factors who were diagnosed withlung cancer or other ... cancers. It's certainly reasonable to suspect there could be an association with the development of emphysema." Though more study is needed, he says, "for the recreational user with a full life expectancy, the potentially harmful effects of marijuana smoking are a legitimate concern."

Fawned

"The researchers were unable to show that marijuana smoking is a cause of emphysema." You debunked your own crap article in your own crap article.
http://blog.norml.org/2013/07/09/study-marijuana-smoking-not-associated-with-airway-cancers-copd-emphysema-or-other-tobacco-related-plumonary-complications/
Actually you can use medical marijuana to treat emphysema!
https://www.compassionatecertificationcenters.com/medical-marijuana-for-emphysema/

DickD

As long as you are happy, fine, the risk is yours.

DickD

Fawned, do you have a medical condition or do you just want marijuana for recreational use?

KellyAlzan

Doesn't matter

DickD

Did I ask you, Kelly?

Dwasserba

"Most cannabis will be available as pills, oils, topical lotions or patches, and many products are specifically designed to lack hallucinogenic properties." YAWN

DickD

http://raysahelian.com/marijuana.html

Marijuana side effects on the body, physiological, mental
Short-term marijuana side effects include memory and learning problems, distorted perception, and difficulty thinking and solving problems. Many people notice euphoria, relaxation, a sense of wellbeing, sleepiness, increased appetite, and better music appreciation. Others may not like the effects and could experience unpleasant thoughts and paranoid feelings.
Long term side effects of heavy and regular marijuana use include lung disease, chronic cough, mucus, nasal congestion, lack of motivation, decrease in sexual desire, a few extra pounds, and potentially various typescancer. However, one study listed below shows no link between marijuana smoking and lung cancer. Heavy and regular consumption of marijuana triggers psychosis and schizophrenia in a small number of people. MRI tests show patients given the active cannabis compound tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) have reduced function in the inferior frontal cortex brain region. This area is associated with controlling inappropriate emotional and behavioral responses to situations.

Anxiety and panic attacks can occur in some users, and in infrequent cases cannabis may trigger schizophrenia in those who were perhaps genetically predisposed to this mental condition.

People who smoke marijuana are much more likely to have paranoia than people who don't use the drug. A July 2014 study identifies psychological factors that can lead to feelings of paranoia in people exposed to the main psychoactive ingredient in marijuana, THC. The team of researchers, led by Professor Daniel Freeman, PHD, of the University of Oxford, found that worrying, low self-esteem, anxiety, depression, and having a range of unsettling changes in perceptions most likely lead to the feelings of paranoia. Freeman, D. Schizophrenia Bulletin, published online July 15, 2014.Daniel Freeman, PhD, professor, Department of Psychiatry, University of Oxford.

Smoking especially strong pot — or skunk — may damage nerve fibers responsible for sending and receiving messages in the brain. Researchers in Italy and the U.K. in 2015 found a bigger effect on the corpus callosum in people who smoked high-potency cannabis than people who smoked marijuana with lower levels of THC or those didn't smoke at all. This could lead to a higher rate of psychosis.

Men who were heavy pot smokers in their teens may not live as long as those who did not use marijuana when they were young.

Fawned

http://norml.org/component/zoo/category/recent-research-on-medical-marijuana

Nevertheless, there exists little if any scientific basis to justify the federal government's present prohibitive stance and there is ample scientific and empirical evidence to rebut it. Despite the US government's nearly century-long prohibition of the plant, cannabis is nonetheless one of the most investigated therapeutically active substances in history. To date, there are approximately 22,000 published studies or reviews in the scientific literature referencing the cannabis plant and its cannabinoids, nearly half of which were published within the ten years according to a key word search on the search engine PubMed Central, the US government repository for peer-reviewed scientific research. While much of the renewed interest in cannabinoid therapeutics is a result of the discovery of the endocannabinoid regulatory system (which is described in detail later in this booklet), some of this increased attention is also due to the growing body of testimonials from medical cannabis patients and their physicians.

The scientific conclusions of the overwhelmingly majority of modern research directly conflicts with the federal government's stance that cannabis is a highly dangerous substance worthy of absolute criminalization.

For example, in February 2010 investigators at the University of California Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research publicly announced the findings of a series of randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials on the medical utility of inhaled cannabis. The studies, which utilized the so-called 'gold standard' FDA clinical trial design, concluded that marijuana ought to be a "first line treatment" for patients with neuropathy and other serious illnesses.

Several of studies conducted by the Center assessed smoked marijuana's ability to alleviate neuropathic pain, a notoriously difficult to treat type of nerve pain associated with cancer, diabetes, HIV/AIDS, spinal cord injury and many other debilitating conditions. Each of the trials found that cannabis consistently reduced patients' pain levels to a degree that was as good or better than currently available medications.

Another study conducted by the Center's investigators assessed the use of marijuana as a treatment for patients suffering from multiple sclerosis. That study determined that "smoked cannabis was superior to placebo in reducing spasticity and pain in patients with MS, and provided some benefit beyond currently prescribed treatments."

A summary of the Center's clinical trials, published in 2012 in the Open Neurology Journal, concluded: "Evidence is accumulating that cannabinoids may be useful medicine for certain indications. ... The classification of marijuana as a Schedule I drug as well as the continuing controversy as to whether or not cannabis is of medical value are obstacles to medical progress in this area. Based on evidence currently available the Schedule I classification is not tenable; it is not accurate that cannabis has no medical value, or that information on safety is lacking."

Around the globe, similarly controlled trials are also taking place. A 2010 review by researchers in Germany reports that since 2005 there have been 37 controlled studies assessing the safety and efficacy of marijuana and its naturally occurring compounds in a total of 2,563 subjects. By contrast, many FDA-approved drugs go through far fewer trials involving far fewer subjects. In fact, according a 2014 review paper published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the median number of pivotal trials performed prior to FDA drug approval is no more than two and over one-third of newly approved pharmaceuticals are brought to market on the basis of only a single pivotal trial.

As clinical research into the therapeutic value of cannabinoids has proliferated so too has investigators' understanding of cannabis' remarkable capability to combat disease. Whereas researchers in the 1970s, 80s, and 90s primarily assessed cannabis' ability to temporarily alleviate various disease symptoms -- such as the nausea associated with cancer chemotherapy -- scientists today are exploring the potential role of cannabinoids to modify disease.

Of particular interest, scientists are investigating cannabinoids' capacity to moderate autoimmune disorders such as multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and inflammatory bowel disease, as well as their role in the treatment of neurological disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (a.k.a. Lou Gehrig's disease.) In 2009, the American Medical Association (AMA) resolved "that marijuana's status as a federal Schedule I controlled substance be reviewed with the goal of facilitating the conduct of clinical research and development of cannabinoid-based medicines."

Investigators are also studying the anti-cancer activities of cannabis, as a growing body of preclinical and clinical data concludes that cannabinoids can reduce the spread of specific cancer cells via apoptosis (programmed cell death) and by the inhibition of angiogenesis (the formation of new blood vessels).

Researchers are also exploring the use of cannabis as a harm reduction alternative for chronic pain patients. According to the findings of a 2015 study published by the National Bureau of Economic Research, a non-partisan think-tank, "[S]tates permitting medical marijuana dispensaries experience a relative decrease in both opioid addictions and opioid overdose deaths compared to states that do not." The NBER findings are similar to those published in 2014 in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) Internal Medicine which also reported that the enactment of statewide medicinal marijuana laws is associated with significantly lower state-level opioid overdose mortality rates. "States with medical cannabis laws had a 24.8 percent lower mean annual opioid overdose mortality rate compared with states without medical cannabis laws," researchers concluded. Specifically, they determined that overdose deaths from opioids decreased by an average of 20 percent one year after the law's implementation, 25 percent by two years, and up to 33 percent by years five and six.

Samanthapowers

sherf david clarke jr just wants the attention. don't you have some so called illegals to roust, sherf?

DisabledFrederickVeteran

Why not legalize heroin and crack they're less dangerous than opioids.

Samanthapowers

um, heroin is an opioid...

Brookhawk

So MD takes 5 years after it's passed by the legislature to even get started on a medical marijuana program. Meanwhile, marijuana is being legalized -period - in more and more states. MD is way behind the trend on this subject.

public-redux

I like the part where the high sheriff decided to go in only after he saw the chance for a photo op.

KellyAlzan

[lol][lol][lol]

armillary


Does the sheriff's office patrol TJ drive pain clinics looking for illegal prescriptions? No, those places are regulated.

Does the sheriff's office sit outside neighborhood pharmacies checking customer prescriptions? No, those places are regulated.

If the sheriff's deputy finds prescription drugs in a traffic stop, how do they know the driver has been prescribed these drugs? It says so on the bottle. Otherwise the driver must produce prescription info as proof.

A medical marijuana dispensary is regulated, requires a prescription and provides a labeled container, just like other pharmacies. I don't see what the big deal is.

Fawned

[thumbup][thumbup][thumbup]

KellyAlzan

[thumbup][thumbup][thumbup]

DisabledFrederickVeteran

The government launching a campaign against tobacco usage while embracing marijuana legalization and then attempting to implement subsidized healthcare on the backs of non smokers is hilarious.

Fawned

Tobacco and marijuana are not comparable at all. Tobacco has no medical benefits and it kills you. Marijuana has numerous health benefits and doesn't kill you.

DisabledFrederickVeteran

Marijuana has been shown to cause immune system dysfunction, which could theoretically predispose individuals to cancer.
Marijuana smoking does cause inflammation and cell damage, and it has been associated with precancerous changes in lung tissue.

Fawned

Actually it has been shown to reduce chronic inflammation and helps treat cancer symptoms. Also, "Significant research has demonstrated that cannabinoids may inhibit or stop the growth of cancers — including breast, brain, liver, pheochromocytoma, melanoma, leukemia, and other kinds of cancer — from spreading or growing. Moreover, cannabinoids have proven to promote apoptosis, the programmed death of tumor cells, while stopping angiogenesis, blood vessel production to the tumor. One study, conducted by Madrid’s Complutense University, showed that in one-third of rats treated, the injection of synthetic THC eliminated malignant brain tumors while extending life in another third." Any other myths you need me to dispel today?

DickD

It also causes medical conditions.

DisabledFrederickVeteran

The sheriffs office was also surprised by the heroin and opioid tsunami.

DickD

If you can get cannabis from the dispensary, who can carry it? Must it be the one it is being prescribed to or can anyone carry it? If anyone can carry it, it becomes a real legitimate problem for the Sheriff. And if someone has a prescription what happens if they share it with someone without a prescription, are both guilty? This is going to cause more problems than it is worth.

Fawned

For gods sake dick, they've been farting around perfecting laws of medical cannabis for 3 years, answering all these dumbass questions. Google it

Thewheelone

Dick, why would this be any different from someone picking up a prescription for you at a drug store?

DickD

A doctor's prescription is okay, but a drug store has people trained on all drugs - a pharmist.

KellyAlzan

Dick you sound more and more like a GOP'er everyday

DickD

Kelly, I believe in law and order, it is necessary to have a good life and a good community. If that makes me sound GOP, so be it, but I really am a liberal on most social issues.

priorparent

Jenkins should be more concerned with alcohol sales and drunk drivers then medical marijuana. Seriously alcohol is worse for the person consuming it, jeapordizes the safety of the community and is much more addictive.

DickD

Alcohol is a problem, but does that justify making more problems? And the jury is still out on just how dangerous and addictive marijuana is. In Washington State the amount of car accidents and deaths went up after they legalized marijuana.

Fawned

Just want to add for anyone reading this comment - it's wrong. In the study he cites 2/3rds of the accidents were people drinking alcohol. The jury is not out they came back and said marijuana is not dangerous or addictive. I wonder if the researchers see comments like this and wonder why they even bother.

jwhamann

Sales of tater chips skyrocketed, though.

Fawned

Right?!?! [lol]

Thewheelone

[thumbup] Priorparent

bicep42

He's too busy harassing immigrants.

KellyAlzan

[thumbup]

Burgessdr

No. Harassing anyone brown.

KellyAlzan

I'd cry baby wasn't so focused on bullying brown skinned people - perhaps this would not have caught him off guard........

slsmithmd

Wow....what a NASTY person you are. Hate does not help anything as you elude to above - SOOOOOOO why do you exhibit the same?

KellyAlzan

Couldn't agree with you more. The sheriffs hate for latinos is not needed

CDReid

You know, Kelly, you have become so redundant with your b*tching and whining about both the Sheriff and President Trump that any credibility your complaints may have had was gone a long time ago. Can't you find a new tune to play or are you just content to sound like a broken record? 1) We all know your thoughts on the two men and 2) those thoughts don't make a rat's @ss to either of them.

KellyAlzan

Thanks for being a loyal follower [love]

BigAl

Have you ever spoken with him about his reasons for doing what he does? Have you spoken with any of the Hispanic officers who work for him? Do you have any idea what runnng a detention facility is like in America now? You take these shots without the facts.

KellyAlzan

You obviously do not live in Frederick county. In MOCO the sheriffs occidental primarily operates the "detention center" there. But I'm Frederick county, Maryland, there is more to the sheriffs office than just a "detention center".

Presumptions of what I / One doesn't know is not how you should govern yourself.

frederick coach

no the sheriffs office in moco does not operate the detention center...you really do live in frederick county.......get your facts straight

KellyAlzan

Thanks for responding!

Lev928

KellyAlzan ... Montgomery County has it's own department of correction. It is not part of the sheriff's office nor the county police. The MoCo sheriff's office is responsible for transporting inmates from jail to jail (although they refuse to do it at night and the county police are forced to do it), transporting inmates from jail to court, serving civil documents and providing security at the courthouse. MoCo sheriff's are NOT patrol deputies such as in Frederick County. FCSO is a "full service" law enforcement agency that includes patrol. Just an FYI ... not trying to bash.

KellyAlzan

Don't mind the smart phone typos / deficient autocorrect

CDReid

And you don't know how to proof read what you wrote before posting it? Easy to blame an inanimate object, isn't it?

DisabledFrederickVeteran

I live here and I have two siblings that are law enforcement officers. In America thank GOD will still have free will and not all law enforcement officers support the sheriff.

Fawned

Oop [lol]

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it clean. Please avoid obscene, vulgar, lewd, racist or sexually-oriented language.
Engage ideas. This forum is for the exchange of ideas, insights and experiences, not personal attacks. Ad hominen criticisms are not allowed. Focus on ideas instead.
TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
Don't threaten. Threats of harming another person will not be tolerated.
Be truthful. Don't knowingly lie about anyone or anything.
Be nice. No racism, sexism or any sort of -ism that is degrading to another person.
No trolls. Off-topic comments and comments that bait others are not allowed.
No spamming. This is not the place to sell miracle cures.
Say it once. No repeat or repetitive posts, please.
Help us. Use the 'Report' link on each comment to let us know of abusive posts.