Imagine a high school classroom where the history teacher asks the students how societal structures continue to support the enslavement of Black people. Then the conversation continues to dissect the role of slaves in the development of America, abandoning the predictable narrative of the Civil War, emancipation, freedom.

That curriculum exists. The Pulitzer Center helped turn The New York Times’ The 1619 Project — which received worldwide attention when it was published last year — into a curriculum that’s now taught in more than 4,500 schools nationwide.

In conjunction with the new teachings, the Heritage Foundation, a conservative research and educational institution, sent a survey conducted by Braun Research to 1,001 parents and 566 school board members across the country to measure their outlook toward the state of civics education and The 1619 Project as a whole.

Two-thirds of the parents surveyed, 74 percent of who were white, think the current civics education in public schools provides enough historical instruction, and about the same amount do not think schools should reframe the teachings to tell students that U.S. history has been tainted by slavery and racism.

Similarly, 73 percent of the surveyed school board members, 53 percent of who are located in the southern region, think that 1776 should remain America’s birth year, a year the contributors of the project want to change to 1619 to mark the first enslaved Africans arriving in the U.S.

Frederick County Public Schools teachers were informed of the curriculum shortly after it was created in August 2019, according to Kevin Cuppett, the district’s Executive Director of Department of Curriculum, Instruction and Innovation.

As a curriculum specialist, Cuppett said he and his team ensure that the teaching materials are reflective of the district’s diversity. In the 2019 school year, 57.3 percent of students were white, 18 percent were Hispanic/Latino, and 12.8 percent were Black.

While The 1619 Project curriculum isn’t mandated, the content “can certainly be used during instruction,” Cuppett said in an email. Cuppett is not sure if any teachers have utilized the teachings.

The curriculum provides teachers with the full NYT Magazine issue and reading guides for the project’s essays and poems for free. The goal is to connect with students beyond the reach of the magazine, according to Mark Schulte, the Pulitzer Center’s Education Director — and in doing so, ignite student interest.

“American students are typically taught that slavery came and went, that it’s a relic of our past,” Schulte said in an email. “But The 1619 Project shows its pernicious repercussions.”

Linda Villarosa, author of an essay in the project, said it’s important for educators and students to learn how to talk about slavery and America’s history. Villarosa was surprised to see that when her children attended grade school, they learned about the same amount of American history as she was taught growing up.

“How can this be? We’re two generations apart, and my own children are not getting any better education on slavery in America,” Villarosa said.

Whether a family owned slaves or not, it’s important for students to understand America was built on the backs of Black people, how many of the structures in the U.S. are tainted by enslavement, Villarosa said.

Before working on The 1619 Project, Villarosa didn’t know what that year stood for.

“It needs to be taught because it is so important to the fabric of our country,” Villarosa said. “It’s also unfair and wrong to erase this large part of our culture in our history.”

The 1619 Project is a story of survival and resilience, Villarosa said: “We’ve got to learn how to talk about it.”

(61) comments

des21

I wonder what percentage of parents will home school after this shutdown and what the consequences of that for school funding will be. Losing students, no money spent of fuel/maintenance for transportation fleet, etc., is it possible teacher unions may NOT ask for more money for once? Short answer- no. They have this new curriculum to train on!

If this nonsense is adopted as an alternative truth (see, leftists do that too, who knew right?) I'm pretty sure the ranks of the home schooled will grow.

Woodrow Wilson (the only Ph.D. in Politics to become President, President of Princeton, champion of the League of Nations- until lately a "good" guy, now bad) said that it was the job of college to make you hate your father. Now it's the job of your 4th grade teacher. For God's sake let kids enjoy a little bit of positivity before you indoctrinate them to the misery of the liberal Left. They won't be teaching this bs to my kids, I assure you of that.

Spoiler alert! America, like virtually every diverse nation on earth, has a complicated and not entirely positive story when it comes to race relations. Still better than all the other "great" powers historically. Be proud not ashamed.

bosco

And for those who support trade with China and don't like Buy American because it's racist, here's an article from CNN Money about modern day slavery in China. Think about this the next time you pick up a product that's made in China. You may be supporting slavery.

https://money.cnn.com/2016/08/11/news/modern-slavery-china-india/index.html

[ninja]

TomWheatley

Maybe develop a course on "Slavery thruout History" as in the Babylonians, Egyptians, Romans, Mayans, etc, etc. and include indentured servants as well. Explain why those cultures had slavery and why others like Russia did not (I might be wrong on that, btw). India did not have slavery per se, but the caste system and untouchables was/is almost as bad.

And as for structures being built on the backs of slaves, let's not forget the Chinese laborers on the railroads, "Irish need not apply" signs, discrimination against Southern Italians, Polish, Jews ... the list sadly enough is rather long.

sevenstones1000

Tom - you are a prime example of why this needs to be taught in school. You are so sadly uneducated. The Chinese and the Irish were paid. They were not owned. Their children were not sold away from them,

TomWheatley

I was going for slavery in the first part and discrimination in the second.

shiftless88

There has never been such a wholesale slavery of people so far from their homes and for so long as the US slave trade. I knew someone would try to deflect rather than to own up to this fact and address it head on. The repercussions from that period of our country still reverberate today.

awteam2000

The matter is definitely an open wound and still festering. Just listen to the president. We are nowhere near over our “original sin”.

C.D.Reid

BS, shiftless. I take it you either haven't read my 1:30 pm reply to you, or you chose to ignore it. If the former is the case, let me repost it in part for you now;

"Shiftless,....... I suggest you do an online search for "History of the Trans Atlantic slave trade." I believe you'll be surprised to learn just when it did start, how many slaves were involved and, most importantly, just where all those slaves were shipped to. For instance, did you know that less than 4% of the approximately 12.5 million slaves involved ended up in what became the U.S.?"

And for you to state that "There has never been such a wholesale slavery of people so far from their homes and for so long as the US slave trade" really does show your ignorance on the subject, because "wholesale" slavery is still going on in Africa today. You really should educate yourself.

shiftless88

You completely missed the point of my post below, so a response was not necessary. So where did the 96% go?

C.D.Reid

Mostly the the Caribbean colonies and Brazil, with Brazil getting by far the vast majority of them. Why don't you do some research and see for yourself? Don't you have a computer, or are you just plain lazy?

wran

You are correct Spain brought slavery to the new world, and there were many, many more slaves in the Spanish colonies than in the English colonies.

wran

Russians were essentially enslaved by the Mongols for years. Had to pay huge sums of tribute (the Golden Horde) in exchange for not being destroyed by the Mongols.

Blueline

As mentioned, the 1619 Project has been cited for historical inaccuracies & false assumptions by leading scholars of the Revolutionary & Civil Wars. It would appear that the author, Ms. Hannah-Jones, concocted a money making scheme, as she has gone on the lucrative college lecture circuit earning $35-60K for an hour presentation.

awteam2000

Woods nor McPherson never said there were “historical inaccuracies & false assumptions”. Read their N.Y. Times interviews... and show me where they do? What they were challenging was her perspective of events, not that the events didn’t happen.

C.D.Reid

Here aw, educate yourself or remain uninformed. The choice is yours:

https://www.nationalreview.com/2020/01/1619-project-top-historians-criticize-new-york-times-slavery-feature/

awteam2000

The following isn’t a reporter‘s view of what Wood and McPherson said, but what they actually did say, their perspectives. Not taken out of context. By the way, James McPherson’s ‘ Battle Cry for Freedom’ Is my “go-to” nonfiction novel on the Civil War. I can appreciate his historical perspective, while understanding the perspective of the enslaved. The view is very different if you are the one with knee on your neck!

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/11/14/mcph-n14.html https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2019/11/28/wood-n28.html

C.D.Reid

Well, aw, a knee on my neck is one thing I guess I'll never have to worry about because I have no intention of ever getting jacked up on fentanyl and methamphetamine and then going out and trying to pass off counterfeit money. And then resist arrest if I were to get busted for doing so.

awteam2000

KR999, I was using a “metaphor” to describe ones perceptions of enslavement.

I was not suggesting you do drugs. And of course police brutality is not the solution to drug addiction but one of the arguments for police reform.

Perceptions are greatly influenced by whether you’re the one persecuting or the one persecuted, apprehended or being apprehended, advantaged or disadvantaged, master or slave.

wran

Right on Blueline. I would add: The article says "America was built on the backs of black people" and there are many structures in our country that were built by slaves. Neither is true. America was not built on the backs of black slaves. A small percentage of people owned slaves in the South, about 3 %, mostly the large cotton, tobacco, and rice plantation owners. Agricultural endeavors. Slaves had no role in building America other than their enslavement to the plantation owners. And, actually, a higher percentage of free blacks owned slaves, about 20 %. The first slave owner in what became the US was Anthony Johnson, a free black man living in Maryland. He obtained his first slave by going to court claiming that his indentured servant had fled and not completed his obligation. The court ruled that the servant was indentured to Johnson for life, making him a slave. Slaves had essentially no role in building America outside of the plantations. They were not involved in digging the Erie Canal, the industrialization of the north, the building of New York, Boston, and other cities, the building of the railroads, etc. America was not built on the backs of black slaves. Most of American was built on the labor and backs of Irish, Chinese, Italians. So, all you experts can now flame away at what I have said, and I have no doubt you will.

MRS M

Imbedded racism, prejudice, suppression and hatred of "the other" is taught at Grandpa (and Grandma's) knee. Why not give generations to come the opportunity to learn, explore.....and then consider..... that there is an untold and deeper history of slavery, which does not conform to Grandpa and Grandma's "teachings" on slavery, many times garnered from viewings of "Gone With the Wind", and the fairytales told of the "proud history" of the "Old South"? Who knows? Even the most callous amongst us might begin to understand? Or, develop a modicum of empathy, in being exposed to these materials? Perhaps some study of the 1619 Project materials might offer enlightenment and deeper understanding to students who have not been exposed to the unrelenting suffering caused by slavery and it's ramifications, to this day. This learning experience, if adopted, need not cause the complete revision of American history, nor must it strike such deep fear into the great local historians know as Grandpap and MeeMaw.

des21

[yawn]

sevenstones1000

An inaccurate curriculum NEEDS to be revised! When the history of an entire national experience - slavery and Jim Crow and race-based laws - is repressed and our citizens grow up ignorant of the causes of their current dilemmas, that needs to be corrected.

America is for all of our citizens, including those formerly enslaved. We all need to know the truth.

C.D.Reid

No one today was " formerly enslaved." I suggest you read up on historical facts rather then the revisionist myths.

sevenstones1000

No one today fought in the Revolution, either, but we still study it.

C.D.Reid

That's true, seven, but you wrote "America is for all of our citizens, including those formerly enslaved." And, as I wrote, nobody alive today was "formerly enslaved." Was the first part of your sentence intended to be in the present tense and the latter part in the past tense?

tonyc51

I can agree that the education system needs to be looked at if the things being discussed here are not being taught in schools now ( I do not mean rewriting the history of the USA to say it was FOUNDED in 1619). I learned about the arrival of slaves, the mistreatment of people in slavery, the civil war, Jim Crow era, the accomplishments of blacks (Booker t. Washington, George Washington Carver, Frederick Douglas, Harriet Tubman, etc.) as well as other relevant topics in school in the 1960's in southern Virginia. My wife is several years younger and schooled in northern NJ knows little about history, she says it was not being taught by the time she was educated, but that she was taught how to think and study. That is a shame and explains a lot of the issues festering now.

awteam2000

Funny. I grew up on the other side of the Delaware river from New Jersey, in Pennsylvania. After the eight grade, over the summer, I had to do a book report on ‘ Uncle Tom’s cabin‘ by Harriet Beecher Stowe 🙇‍♂️. It amazes me how this person “Uncle Tom” (a real person) has over time been demonized, turned into a subordinate of white oppression. While, Simon Legree, the villain is all but forgotten.

BunnyLou

Revisionism, welcome to the world of the left.

Thewheelone

What's being revised, Bunny? Are you capable of expounding on your vast knowledge of continually re stated spin?

bosco

For starters: "73 percent of the surveyed school board members, 53 percent of who are located in the southern region, think that 1776 should remain America’s birth year, a year the contributors of the project want to change to 1619 to mark the first enslaved Africans arriving in the U.S"

[ninja]

Thewheelone

I don't recall asking you, Bosco!

C.D.Reid

It's a public forum, wheelone, you don't need to ask anything in particular of anyone in particular for anyone else to respond.

bosco

I don't recall you being appointed the forum moderator either. [lol][ninja]

C.D.Reid

Nope, that's Pb's job. [lol]

shiftless88

That does not revise any facts, it just shifts the relative importance of the facts. No one denies that 1776 was when the Declaration of Independence was signed and the importance of that event. I personally think that is our "birthday" but it's also important to note the importance of the "pregnancy" period of our nation.

C.D.Reid

Wheelone, I hope you take notice of my 8:15 am reply to you, and learn from it. You are obviously a victim of this revisionism.

awteam2000

Your earlier post is incorrect. Spain attempted to establish a colony in the Carolinas, 1526 bringing slaves but failed. Sir Walter Raleigh made a similar attempt in 1585 also failing. Spain had well established slave colonies in the Caribbean, South America and as far north as Florida.

C.D.Reid

No aw, my original post is not incorrect. I stated that " 1619 was not when the first African slaves arrived in the colonies which became the United States." South Carolina one of the original 13 colonies and the Spanish brought slaves to that area in 1526. Did their colony there succeed? No, it didn't, but that was not the point I was making. My point was that the Trans Atlantic slave trade was in full operation when the Spanish brought slaves here long before any were taken to Jamestown in 1619. Georgia was the southernmost of the 13 colonies and, by your own admission, the Spanish had slave colonies right below it in what was to become Florida. So, your point is.....?

awteam2000

My point being they were not British colonies which became the United States. The first British Colony was Jamestown. Thereafter, African slaves first arrived in 1619 to the new colony. “Now you know the rest of the story”.🤷‍♂️

C.D.Reid

aw, all of the original 13 colonies were British, and South Carolina did not formally become a separate colony until 1712, so let me just rephrase my initial comment; " " 1619 was not when the first African slaves arrived in the land mass which became the United States." There, everything ok now?

shiftless88

kr; to continue my analogy, those other attempts at establishing colonies did not succeed so it is sort of like people who have had sex but without a pregnancy. That man would not be the "father" if nothing took hold.

C.D.Reid

Shiftless, you do realize the point of my comments is that slavery was introduced in what became the United States long before 1619, don't you? I suggest you do an online search for "History of the Trans Atlantic slave trade." I believe you'll be surprised to learn just when it did start, how many slaves were involved and, most importantly, just where all those slaves were shipped to. For instance, did you know that less than 4% of the approximately 12.5 million slaves involved ended up in what became the U.S.?

awteam2000

Kr999, NO IT WASN’T! 🤦‍♂️ Efforts were made to establish colonies and enslave Africans but failed. African slaves were seeded in the Jamestown Settlement In 1619, the first colony, what eventually becomes the United States. NO, not before. No not by the Spanish. And yes, no matter how you cut it, it’s was a horrible labor system and a great part of the America legacy, it’s heritage, the experience, it’s culture and part of the American diatribe today. Yes, it should be taught.

C.D.Reid

aw, you admitted that the Spaniards had "well established slave colonies in Florida:"

awteam2000 Jul 21, 2020 9:25am

"Spain had well established slave colonies in the Caribbean, South America and as far north as Florida."

"From the time of St. Augustine’s founding in early September 1565, African descendants, both free and enslaved, played critical roles in the town’s daily life. Slaves worked local fields, harvesting much-needed maize to support the town’s settlers and the livestock they had brought with them from Europe." (https://www.tampabay.com/opinion/2019/08/29/before-1619-africans-and-the-early-history-of-spanish-colonial-florida-and-america-column/)

I submitted that slavery was started in what eventually became the U.S. long before 1619. So, where am I wrong???

BunnyLou

Put downs such as yours are part and parcel of the fascist left’s game plan to silence those who do not share their world view, TheWheelOne.

Kville

Leading historians have publicly criticized the 1619 Project for outright falsehoods and ignoring facts. It does not belong in any classroom in America. It is not history or factual, it is propaganda intended to create hatred of the United States.

NewMarketParent

Besides making things up completely, you could and try to hear me out here, try to learn something for once instead of caping for white supremacy.

C.D.Reid

Hear you out? What have you said that was either worth listening to, correct, or both?

Kville

‘So wrong in so many ways” is how Gordon Wood, the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian of the American Revolution, characterized the New York Times’s “1619 Project.” James McPherson, dean of Civil War historians and another Pulitzer winner, said the Times presented an “unbalanced, one-sided account” that “left most of the history out.”

C.D.Reid

Typical liberal propaganda trying to rewrite history, 1619 was not when the first African slaves arrived in the colonies which became the United States..

Thewheelone

enlighten us, CD. I have always read that the first slaves came to Jamestown in 1619. Jamestown, Virginia was a colony which later became part of the United States. Am I missing something?

C.D.Reid

Where have you been, wheelone? I've posted multiple times links to the origins of slavery in North America. You obviously have a computer so isn't it simple enough to do your own research? Here are a couple of links to get you started:

https://www.history.com/news/american-slavery-before-jamestown-1619

https://time.com/5653369/august-1619-jamestown-history/

As Bunnyloo said, this is nothing but revisionism, BS coming from the liberal left who believe their opinions on history are the only ones that matter. The problem is it is NOT our history. Right or wrong, the events that led to the building of this great country are written in stone, like it or not, and all the fake stories the left want to come up with about it are just that; fake. Next thing we know, the Fake News will be reporting these lies as news that actually happened hundreds of years ago. If I had a kid in public school today, I'd yank him out in a heart beat and home school him in the original facts on the founding of this country, not the garbage the Left would like you to "think" actually happened. Now, when are the liberals going to do something about the ongoing slave trade in Africa today?

https://qz.com/africa/1333946/global-slavery-index-africa-has-the-highest-rate-of-modern-day-slavery-in-the-world/

Fido will sit at his computer and type the same old, same old, stuff about the last 400 years here, and the slave events during that time, so why doesn't he promote the abolishment of slavery in the land where, 400 years ago, blacks sold their black brothers and sisters into slavery in the first place? Where is the BLM movement in Africa? HUH?

Thewheelone

Your original quote, CD: "1619 was not when the first African slaves arrived in the colonies which became the United States.." You went way beyond my question to you. In fact, it is well documented that in 1619 the first slaves were brought to Virginia. Do you believe otherwise?

C.D.Reid

Wheelone, you obviously have not yet read the links that I provided and, not having done so, why do you even bother me with such an uninformed reply? And why don't you tell me why slavery is, in this modern day and age, so prevalent in Africa?

bosco

“Every record has been destroyed or falsified, every book rewritten, every picture has been repainted, every statue and street building has been renamed, every date has been altered. And the process is continuing day by day and minute by minute. History has stopped. Nothing exists except an endless present in which the Party is always right.”

[ninja]

C.D.Reid

Exactly, bosco. And this reminds me of the scene in "Schindler's List" where Amon Goeth says to the members of the SS:

Today is history. Today will be remembered. Years from now the young will ask with wonder about this day. Today is history and you are part of it. Six hundred years ago, when elsewhere they were footing the blame for the Black Death, Casimir the Great - so called - told the Jews they could come to Krakow. They came. They trundled their belongings into the city. They settled. They took hold. They prospered in business, science, education, the arts. They came with nothing. And they flourished. For six centuries there has been a Jewish Krakow. By this evening those six centuries will be a rumor. They never happened. Today is history."

A blind man could see the comparison......

sevenstones1000

Where is the record of the black slaves and sharecroppers? Where was the record of the Tulsa Race Riots until “revisionists” brought them to light? It is the history of our black citizens that has been erased.

C.D.Reid

Ummm, seven, there is a wonderous tool for information that Al Gore invented ([lol][lol][lol]) years ago, it's called The Internet, also know as the "World Wide Web." A great deal of what is not in hard copy print is available on it. If you want to learn about black slaves, sharecroppers, the Tulsa Race Riots or anything else for that matter, I suggest you get a computer and go exploring. There is a record of all those subjects, and quite a few more, available there. Try it sometime, it really is both fun and informative.

sevenstones1000

Why should an entire history of our black citizens and slavery be relegated to google searches? Why is it not importantportant enough to learn in class.

C.D.Reid

Well, seven, in the first place, this country was not just built on the backs of black slaves. Believe it or not, there were quite a few other races and minorities involved in it also so, in the second place, should students not be taught about those laborers and their efforts too? Which leads to the third place; just how much time do you think can be allotted to fairly and equally teach about all those who helped build this country, in addition to the other subjects that are to be taught?

awteam2000

One thing I will credit James McPherson’s book ‘The Battle Cry for Freedom’, he tries to share differences based on European lineage, European colonization . North verses South, ‘the Manifest Destiny’, US expansionism and regional powers leading up to the civil war. But McPherson will also admit, he doesn’t capture the African slaves views of there experience.

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