ANNAPOLIS — A bill proposed by Del. Dana Stein and co-sponsored by Del. Karen Lewis Young would ban organized hunting competitions statewide.

The proposal, House Bill 863, is an attempt to protect “fur-bearing animals” or “unprotected mammals” from being hunted and killed for money or prizes. The Humane Society of the United States recently reported one of these contests was held at the Linganore Grange #410 in Unionville, in eastern Frederick County, earlier this year.

About 250 red foxes, coyotes and raccoons were killed at an event held by the Predator Hunters of Maryland in January, according to the report by the Humane Society. Representatives of the Linganore Grange said they hosted the event but were not involved in organizing it. The Predator Hunters of Maryland did not respond to two requests for comment.

Organized hunting contests are legal in Maryland, and many who opposed the bill at its hearing before the House of Delegates’ Environment and Transportation Committee earlier this week said these events help with population control. They also said the money at these contests help pay for the equipment needed to keep these animals off farms in rural areas.

Many organizations, however — including the National Coalition to End Wildlife Killing Contests — argue the contests harm ecosystems and are not good for wildlife conservation.

“While managing to reduce the loss of livestock is a common goal for all stakeholders, wildlife killing contests do not contribute to this goal and may work against it,” according to a letter from the coalition, signed by more than 70 conservation scientists around the globe.

Stein (D-Baltimore County) said he understands his proposal is a contentious one, drawing strong opinions from both those who support and oppose it. He added, however, one thing that struck him was seeing photos of stacks of dead foxes and other animals.

“To me, it questions the reason for the hunt, it’s cruel and inhumane,” he said. “It’s one thing if deer are being hunted and they’re donated to say, the Maryland Food Bank. But here … be it foxes, raccoons, whatever, typically fur-bearing animals ... it just seems like they’re slaughtered for a contest with the idea of hunting for wildlife management.”

If Stein’s proposal becomes law, the penalty for holding the contests would be a misdemeanor, subject to a fine of up to $1,500, which is the current Department of Natural Resources fine for a violation. Five other states currently have a similar law in place.

Gregg Bortz, a DNR spokesman, declined to comment on the pending legislation. But he did say that, while the department doesn’t keep track of the population count of fur bearing animals countywide, “trends suggest the populations have remained consistent, with a possible slight increase.”

There also has been an increase in wildlife nuisance hotline calls reported to the USDA Wildlife Office, Bortz said. In 2010, 30 calls were reported, according to data from USDA. By 2018, 111 calls were reported.

Lewis Young (D-Frederick) said she co-sponsored Stein’s legislation because of the nature of the events, and that it would not affect lawful hunting practices statewide.

“No animal deserves to be killed for ‘entertainment’ or small cash incentives,” Lewis Young wrote in an email. “At the core of these events, there is no purpose other than prizes and bragging rights.”

The Humane Society said in a press release that many animals are taken to a landfill or dump after the contests. Phil Harris, the county’s head of the Department of Solid Waste Management, said they don’t track that data, but added there have been “no visible increases” in wildlife carcasses coming into the landfill in recent weeks.

Sen. Michael Hough (R-Frederick and Carroll) said he hasn’t read the bill, but the competitions, for coyotes especially, are needed, especially given that they hunt in packs. He said he’s shot a coyote in Wyoming before, and has seen the damage they can cause.

“Coyotes are actually real dangerous, because they’ll take down calves or weak animals,” Hough said. “... They’re a real pest and a real problem.”

Stein said he is willing to amend his proposal, including allowing those who own dogs to be able to hunt those animals to keep them in shape. He understands it might have a tough time passing out of committee and in the House.

“It’s one of those issues that generates strong feelings on both sides,” he said. “Look, I’m a proponent of the bill but I can respect the feelings of the other side.”

Staff writer Hannah Himes contributed to this report.

Follow Steve Bohnel on Twitter: @Steve_Bohnel.

Steve Bohnel is the county government reporter for the Frederick News-Post. He can be reached at sbohnel@newspost.com. He graduated from Temple University, with a journalism degree in May 2017, and is a die-hard Everton F.C. fan.

(171) comments

lewisantq

gab - I contacted the Maryland Extension Service. They said that they do not list the coyote as an invasive species. Bob Lewis

rogy

The real problem here is that lawmakers must make laws in order to retain their positions as our elected officials. Hence the name. What we really need is a provision that requires AT LEAST one law or regulation be rescinded for every new law or regulation that is enacted. With 600 to 1000 laws enacted in Maryland alone each year I’d say they are doing their job a little too well. It’s no wonder we keep seeing frivolous proposals almost every day.

jayel86

All I can say is the residents of Frederick know nothing about nature or how it works and how stupid it is to hunt. Very disappointing. This is why we need people like Young who actually get it. Any one taking up for sports hunting, is an idiot.

gabrielshorn2013

Well, that's your opinion jayel, and you are certainly entitled to it. You are even allowed to say it out loud, First Amendment and all. However that does not make it, or you, factually correct. All hunting is bad? Certainly not. We are way over the carrying capacity for deer, but as an avowed nature expert, you already know that, right? Coyotes are not native to this area, and are attacking livestock. Nutria are invasive, and are subject to an eradication effort on the Eastern Shore because of their damage to marshland. DNR has a year long open season on both of these animals because of those facts.

jayel86

Hunting involving cash prizes is not right, and it will only be a total slaughter fest. DNR stepping in is one thing, making it a bingo game is another.

gabrielshorn2013

So, you have a problem trying to increase the effectiveness of an eradication program like they have for invasive species like nutria? Would you say the same thing for the snakehead fish that destroys bass and trout habitat, eating them and their eggs, and will thus eliminate these fish from the Potomac River and its tributaries? Or are snakehead fish not warm and cuddly enough, so they're OK to eradicate? How do you feel about the zebra mussel?

KellyAlzan

Hiding behind a screen name,

Some say isn’t right either.

All a matter of opinion. Really, no one cares about your / our opinions.

jayel86

Oh god this is not at all what I'm saying. I helped eradicate the stink bug threat. I understand invasive species, but there were no cash prizes in how many stinkbugs you could kill, that's just assinine.

jayel86

And Kelly calling yourself "lead commenter" and never shutting up doesn't raise anyone's respect for you.

jayel86

Eradicating the stink bug involved using their own pheromones' against them to confuse their communication. Once an area smells like a threat, they won't return or breed there. Leave invasive species to the professionals, not idiots with guns wanting money.

gabrielshorn2013

jayel, there are not enough DNR agents in the state of Maryland to go to the Eastern Shore and eradicate the nutria alone. It took a concerted effort of DNR officials and private citizens to hunt or trap them (offering prizes), and they are making significant progress. Don't like guns? Don't buy one. But disparaging all hunters because you don't like guns or hunting is just silly. Eleven percent of all hunting-related purchases goes to conservation causes mandated by Federal law, as per the Pitman-Robertson Act.

BTW, you helped "eradicate" the stink bug threat? Ummm...they're still here, and aren't going anywhere anytime soon. They're established now in Maryland until a predatory species reduces their numbers, or unless they become susceptible to a bacterial agent, such as B-t spore. Since this winter was extraordinary mild, there should be a good crop of stinkbugs this year. We had several come in the house already, and it's not even season yet.

jayel86

Gabriel, go kiss your guns because that's all you know...wow clueless.

gabrielshorn2013

[lol][lol][lol] And there it is jayel, you get frustrated and lash out. I already said that I don't like "prize hunting", but in the case of invasive species, wildlife management professionals at DNR must do whatever they can to remove them. Nutria, snakeheads, zebra mussels included. Stink bugs are going nowhere, despite your efforts.

lewisantq

The coyote is the apex predator in our area. It used to be the wolf, who were exterminated by our ancestors. Apex predators play a critical role in our ecosystem. Google wolves / Yellowstone to see the immense impact that an apex predator can have. The suppression of coyotes has an immense impact. There are So many deer that Camp David, Montgomery County parks, jurisdictions and individual farmers have to hire sharpshooters to kill hundreds of deer per year to protect crops and sensitive habitats from overgrazing. Robust populations of apex predators would help maintain proper balance of nature. When man gets involved we almost always screw up everything. Bob Lewis

gabrielshorn2013

So would allowing hunting, without the worry of your kids or pets getting attacked by said Alex predators.

hayduke2

How many kids have been attacked by coyotes???

KellyAlzan

Google

gabrielshorn2013

"We conducted an analysis of coyote attacks on humans in the United States and Canada, including 142 reported incidents of coyote attacks resulting in 159 victims. Most attacks were classified as predatory (37%) or investigative (22%) in nature. The number of reported attacks was nearly equal between adults and children, although child victims were more (p < .001) prevalent in predatory attacks."

https://urbancoyoteresearch.com/resource/coyote-attacks-humans-us-and-canada

threecents

The next sentence in that paper is, "Future coyote attacks could be reduced or prevented through modification of human behavior and public education designed to prevent the habituation of coyotes." I don't necessarily agree with that, but it is the authors' opinion. Also, if we got rid of coyotes, probably another predator would take their place. If not, then the deer problem and problems with smaller varmints would get worse.

gabrielshorn2013

You are correct three. The phrases that I provided were in answer to hay's question of "how many kids have been attacked by coyotes".

hayduke2

From Gabe's reference - Homeowners likely play a large role in preventing future coyote attacks, as the majority of

attacks that we found took place immediately outside the residences of victims. Homeowners have control over several factors in their own yards that could potentially attract

nuisance coyotes and increase the risk of attacks in their neighborhood. These factors

include leaving food outside for pets, intentionally feeding wildlife, and leaving pets outside unattended (especially cats and small dogs) (Timm et al., 2004).

It was reported in 42 of the 142 (30%) incidents that coyotes were either intentionally or

accidentally being fed by residents near the attack site prior to the incident. This figureincludes the incident in which a victim was hand-feeding the coyote that subsequently bit him

gabrielshorn2013

Your point hay? You asked how many, and I gave you a reference. You didn't ask why. Do you think people will change their behaviors and stop feeding their outside pets outside? Nope.

KellyAlzan

Gabs - well Lewislntq seems to think the comments here will change everyone’s minds!! LOL

hayduke2

My point is appealing to emotion and talking about children being attacked when this is a very low or no risk option demonizes a species. Just as many of these types of attacks occur with pit bulls, feral cats, and feral dogs but they don't gin up the fear like your statement. Rational approaches with verified (not self reported ) data are needed.

Greg F

Camp David has sharpshooters to keep the deer from constantly setting off their intruder detection apparatus. Coyotes are an apex predator but also a massive nuisance to farmers and anyone with any livestock. They ransack and destroy deer populations and have attacked people as well. Farmers hire regular hunters cs sharpshooters via crop damage permits that allow them to grow crops without the massive damage they otherwise cause. I guess you want to protect the stink bug too?

gabrielshorn2013

Another invasive species that has not been mentioned here are nutria, who have taken up residence on the Eastern Shore, and moving onto the Western Shore of the Chesapeake. These rodents, similar to beavers, are notorious burrowers who eat the roods of marsh grasses, causing loss of marshland and ecosystems. There are no natural predators for them on the Eastern Shore, and an eradication program is ongoing. https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/Pages/plants_wildlife/invasives/inv_Nutria.aspx

lewisantq

I have friends who have a small farm near Carlisle,PA. They raise sheep, have a cow, chickens dogs and cats. For years they have had a coyote den in the field behind their house. They took normal precautions by putting their animals away at night and have had no problems with the coyotes. Sensible precautions can eliminate conflicts with predators. Bob Lewis

KellyAlzan

Tell that to the ranchers out west, I’m

Sure they appreciate the FNP Expertise

lewisantq

Project coyote was started by western ranchers who saw the futility of widespread slaughter of predators. You might learn something if you go to their website. Bob

KellyAlzan

You are being a little emotional towards me, bob. And losing your ability to be reasonable.

I mentioned that I am knowledgeable on the canidae family. As I am. And you seem to be bothered by this. If you knew how I became well acquainted with the canidae family, you would probably be embarrassed with how you have responded to me. I’m not interested in sharing that.

I know nothing about the organizations you have mentioned. And I am not interested in knowing about them. Knowledge of the animal(s) and knowledge of organizations are two different spectrums. Please respect that.

lewisantq

Kelly, I am not at all emotional. You said "I know all there is about the canidae family". not " you are knowledgeable on the canidae family". There is a huge difference in those statements. Your refusal to add to your information is remarkable. How can you be taken seriously? Bob

KellyAlzan

Refusal? I said what I wanted to say. Credibility? Who cares. Some people get all worked up and take this forum and theirselves way too seriously. I, on the other hand, make my comment, and I move on. If anyone wants to be upset - let them. If anyone doesn’t want to believe me - they aren’t the first and won’t be the last. And those that worship the ground I walk on - I love you too!

n) I made a statement about coyotes are in fact pack animals.

n) someone responded saying I was wrong.

n) I was not and I am not wrong. I know all about wild life. When you live in a very rural area - you observe. You learn. Knowledge is king.

n) I then responded to the comment, responded that I am not wrong. And that I happen to have knowledge on the matter.

n) there is / was nothing else to say. I know what I know, and I know who o am. Strangers in cyberspace will not control my happiness, not have any ability to make me feel differently about myself, including you.

n) you then got your panties in a bind. And proceeded to tell me how foolish I am. And you then, went on to change the context of my comments. Because you judged me, and inaccurately so.

n) I do not owe anyone a response, especially when they’re panties Are all waded up.

Kelly q Alzan

Lead Commenter

FNP C.O.T.Y. 2015

gabrielshorn2013

You tell 'em Plumbum! 🤣

mrnatural1

Quote:

"About 250 red foxes, coyotes and raccoons were killed at an event held by the Predator Hunters of Maryland in January, according to the report by the Humane Society."

Question:

250 is a large number. Are some/all of these animals brought in for the 'contest'?

KellyAlzan

No. The population is rather abundant.

jayel86

No. That's sick. All killed for absolutely nothing. Hunting is not at all what's that'd about, in fact the opposite, using every part of an animals killed is what's it's about. You don't respect life or nature to condone that.

KellyAlzan

Don’t shoot the messenger

jayel86

I agree with you, thats a lot of needless deaths for nothing but pure sport. Ani,also are innocent, and donot deserve to be killed for cash prizes.

shiftless88

The irony of people in Frederick county wanting to live here because it is "in the country" and then complaining about the native animals is a bit much. Yes, coyotes are non native so perhaps you carve out an exception. But unlike deer hunting and fishing tournaments, this has nothing to do with food. Likely not fur, either (how many coonskin or fox hats have you seen lately?). Everyone wants to tame the world but I do not think it should be tamed. At least not completely.

threecents

This bill is not expected to pass, but it is obviously useful in that it brought attention to this issue. I think these sport hunts should be regulated and only allowed if they are useful.

DickD

A bunch of nuts and crackpots! Fox and racoons are known for their rabies!

lewisantq

DickD, Fox and raccoons get rabies. So do opossoms, bats, wolves, badgers, cats, dogs, skunks, monkeys, horses and deer. Maybe you want to kill them all but I don't. Bob Lewis

jayel86

Which they contract from bat bites usually.

hayduke2

Overblown fear!

jayel86

Bats are the main carriers of rabies. Look it up.

gabrielshorn2013

In Maryland, rabies is most frequently found in wildlife, most commonly raccoons, foxes, skunks, and bats. Domestic animals, including livestock, are also at risk, and cats are the most frequently identified rabid domestic animal.

https://phpa.health.maryland.gov/OIDEOR/CZVBD/Pages/rabies.aspx

Rabies occurs in animals such as feral cats, skunks, foxes and bats, though raccoons are the most common carrier in Maryland, according to the release.Oct 24, 2019

https://www.baltimoresun.com/maryland/carroll/news/cc-rabid-raccoon-sykesville-taneytown-20191024-hps7l2jbzzdcdkcb5s72yrczk4-story.html%3foutputType=amp

jth7100

Some people like to kill and then rationalize it. Also, since God made foxes and coyotes, where do you get off questioning God?

DickD

Good question, another question, why do we have wars?

KR999

Wars are fought primarily over land and religion.

threecents

Why do we have diseases?

gabrielshorn2013

Who?

Greg F

Which of the hundreds of thousands of gods made anything? God is not real...and if he/she/it were, he’d have given the animals rifles to shoot back.

Comment deleted.
Greg F

See mine

Crab0721

This is getting out of hand with these bans. People take trips to go Bear Hunting, we have fishing tournaments, people gather to go and hunt these animals and have them stuffed and mounted and also I know of a state that you can go rattlesnake hunting.

The are taking away everything from us and next thing we know we will have nothing left to do in MD we will be slaves to the state of MD and the government.

hayduke2

Nonsense... We have the bay, the mountains, trails, bike trails, natural wonders and everything in between. Get real.

Alice Jones

Taking away everything? Are you a child? Not to mention what you advocate is not hunting at all. It's lazy people that are too slovenly to get off their cans. Now, I am not advocating one way or the other about coyotes but I will say that as we sow, so shall we reap.

threecents

Crab0721, I get the feeling you just want to kill animals with your friends, and you are upset that anyone would want to interfere with your good clean fun. That's so sweet.[censored]

jayel86

Its called, finding a new hobby and not killing living things for sport.

Greg F

People kill cows to be able to get Big Macs.

jayel86

Crab, you sound obsessed with needless hunting and killing just to mount an innocent animals head over the tv. You do realize there are many better way to spend your time in life?

tonyc51

There must be something that is more important than this to be spending time on in Annapolis!!!! But I suppose if they are dealing with these end of the world issues, they have already dealt with other trivial issues (IE Corona Virus threat, poverty, crime in Baltimore).

jayel86

Not really, its is important because offering money to kill wildlife will makes hunters kill for sport. Animals that are not even dangerous will be killed if this isn't changed. Its kind of really important and I like they are addressing early.

tonyc51

And you feel that is more important than the crime issue, the drug problems, etc. There are numerous issues more important, but are pushed aside by feel good issues as this.

hayduke2

Strawman argument - of course those are important but that doesn't mean everything else should be ignored.

gabrielshorn2013

Agreed hay, and as you know, I am a strong proponent of the helium balloon release ban because of the damage they do to wildlife, including marine animals and seabirds.

jayel86

Anything involving the destruction of living beings in mass, is yes more important then people killing themselves on drugs.

DickD

All hunting is for sport in today's world. Who needs to put meat on the table by hunting?

KR999

Once again, it's not what someone "needs," it's what they want and are legally entitled to have.

hayduke2

Remove this part of the ecosystem and allow others to overpopulate - things like rats, mice, etc. What possible purpose does killing a fox serve?

tonyc51

Have you never heard of rabies?

hayduke2

Yup - always has been around and will always be around. Remove rabid animals, sure but to say we remove all because they may become rabid ( slight chance ) is stupid. Are you going to remove all dogs, cats, bats, etc.

gabrielshorn2013

Correct tonyc. After raccoons and opossum, fox are a big reservoir of rabies in Maryland.

DickD

Helps to stop the spread of rabies for one thing!

jayel86

Then we should be hunting bats, the true carriers of rabies.

gabrielshorn2013

In Maryland, it is raccoons.

gabrielshorn2013

There was an increase in the fox population about 15-20 or so years ago, resulting in a precipitous drop in quail and pheasant populations in the region. When was the last time you heard "bob...white!"when you were outdoors?

hayduke2

Gabe - you do realize that pheasants are an introduced species and could be considered invasive.

gabrielshorn2013

Yes hay, they could, providing that they were displacing other species or causing environmental or ecosystem harm (As per the US F&WS definition). My point was that when the fox population took off about 20 years ago, the quail, ruffed grouse, and pheasant populations dropped significantly. Add coyotes to the mix, and the damage is greater. How much by either species alone? Dunno, but coyotes are a new arrival (within the last 20 years in Maryland).

tonyc51

Having thought about this more I see the point that this is important, well at least as important as the balloon release ban or the plastic bag ban

hayduke2

Good one tony, if you are a middle schooler.

DickD

Good comparison, Tony, I will give that some thought. Maybe the balloon release is the most important. Do you wonder why we have a legislature for this nonsense?

KellyAlzan

We have seriously defunct Maryland home improvement laws. That are antiquated from the 1960’s. So many senior citizens and unsuspecting people being taken advantage of by illegitimate contractors.

But, we messing around with balloon and canine laws......

KellyAlzan

And I know Karen and ron both read my award winning comments.

Wanna do a a super job of a Bill? Make a bill to overhaul the home Improvement commissison. No license needed to replace carpeting? But a license is needed to stain a deck?

mrnatural1

Kelly,

You don't need no stinkin' license to apply deck stain at our place. [cool]

KellyAlzan

As a contractor. Working in the Commission of commerce

Greg F

Award winning? We’re you on the Gong Show?

KellyAlzan

No. But I was FNP Commenter of

The Year In 2015

Greg F

Lead Commentator? How did you earn that aside from rambling on about things that make no sense to you that everyone else understands?

KellyAlzan

You can become lead Commenter too. Just follow your dream!

pretzel

Oh yeah because it's much better to get hit by a car, damage livestock i.e...….Besides with the overgrowth Frederick seems hell bent on continuing they'll soon have nowhere to live

Alice Jones

Well, let's discuss how many people get hit by cars and how much damage humans inflict on livestock. Humans really are a virus - thank you Matrix.

hayduke2

Come on man - killing livestock?!? I don't know of many areas that promote free range chickens and they certainly aren't taking down larger mammals.

DickD

They do kill livestock, Hay, not often, but sometimes.

hayduke2

So do cars sometimes!

gabrielshorn2013

LOL, city kid hay? Sheep and goats are livestock too, and yes, a single or pack of coyotes can easily take down such animals, especially the smaller breeds like Alpine dairy goats. Domestic cats and smaller dogs don't fare well either. There is a pack of coyotes whose range includes my property. They have harassed my animals several times, and, as invasive pest animals, are fair game if I see them. Unfortunately, they usually hunt at night, and my hunting them at night is not allowed.

hayduke2

City kid, hardy! Coyote predation of livestock is debated as to severity - a number of studies found self reporting of the numbers unverifiable by wildlife experts. BTW, dogs were reported as the second most animal for livestock predation. Are we going to hunt dogs as well??

gabrielshorn2013

Dogs are not an invasive species hay, coyotes are. Hunting coyotes is open year round in Maryland, and most elsewhere.

hayduke2

And coyotes are not an invasive species either. Unlike most invasive species, coyotes are native to North America, with a natural habitat that extends from Alaska to Central America over terrain ranging from mountains to plains to -- these days -- cities (in one notable case, a coyote even staked out a Chicago

gabrielshorn2013

Unless you are a wildlife biologist hay, I'll take the word of those that are, such as the U of MD extension service. Yes, coyotes are indigenous to North America. However, the natural range of the coyote was west of the Mississippi, not Maryland.

"Because of this, the immigration of the coyote in Maryland does not represent a return of a species once present during historic times. Rather, it is considered a new species in the East."

https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/coyotes

hayduke2

And you failed to include the following sentence from your reference Gabe - "They actually were present in the east at one time but were pushed out by development."

gabrielshorn2013

Why should I hay? They were pushed out over a thousand years ago. Here is the entire quote from the U of MD extension service reference:

"One may not think of coyotes living in Maryland, but they now can be found statewide. Populations are highest in the western part of the State and are lower on the eastern shore. Fossil records indicate their presence here in prehistoric eras. They appear to have vanished at least 1,000 years ago. Because of this, the immigration of the coyote in Maryland does not represent a return of a species once present during historic times. Rather, it is considered a new species in the East. They actually were present in the east at one time but were pushed out by development."

hayduke2

And the last statement doesn't refer to the species that existed a thousand years ago.

gabrielshorn2013

Really hay? If you say so. If we're parsing, then what does the following refer to, "Rather, it is considered a new species in the East." Are they referring to the species that vanished 1,000 years ago? If it vanished, how is it new? I'm pretty good at English language paragraph construction, and which sentences pertain to others, so I don't think they referring to those that died out back then. I'm pretty sure they are referring to the ones that are now here; “new “ to the region, and ecosystems. The ones you keep denying are invasive. See my definitions (from three US government offices) at the end of this thread. [wink][cool]

hayduke2

If you read the last sentence, it states that the eastern coyote was impacted by development. Are you telling me that development one thousand years ago by native Americans drove the eastern coyote out? You know Gabe, sometimes theere are mutliple ways to read and interpret what is being said. Heck, even you or I could be wrong sometimes! [beam]

gabrielshorn2013

[thumbup] fair

lewisantq

Thank you Karen. Only 5 states have banned these hunts but legislation is pending in four others. These contests will be a thing of the past. Bob Lewis

threecents

[thumbup]Bob

mgoose806

This woman is an expert in getting publicity. Execution of making Frederick a better place as a results of her efforts...Zero!

marinick1

[thumbup]

DickD

That is only because you don't consider her harm, which would place her below zero.

threecents

[thumbdown]

fjulia

Coyotes are not pack animals. Del. Hough must be confused or ignorant. Yes, they are invasive here, but that's because wolves are gone. Come on, isvthe only way 5o control them is to have organized hunts where hunters go out and then boastvabout what they killed! What hap9ens to the bodies? Are any uses made of the fur? If not, then it's killing for killing's sake, andvreal hunter sports people don't do that. For the same reason, I find bass fishing tournements useless, but I assume tyey eat the fish afterward.

KellyAlzan

My neighbor watched 4 coyotes take down a buck deer. That sound like pack animals to me

lewisantq

Sorry Kelly, fjulia is right.

threecents

Kelly is right. Look it up. Coyotes are pack animals and are closely related to wolves.

Greg F

Fjuliais fjull of it.

jayel86

Its not about that. Killing animals for money prizes will turn it into a slaughter fest. Its not about one pack of coyotes, its about how competitive hunters become and they will kill for sport. Maybe you should think twice about calling yourself "lead commenter"

hayduke2

Great Kelly - deer are overpopulated because predators were eliminated by over hunting and bounties. Let nature do what it does.

KellyAlzan

As an outdoors person, used to be an avid hunter, I know all there is about the canine family.

lewisantq

For those who want to know more about coyotes and the possibility of co-existance log into www.projectcoyote.org. Don't bother Kelly, since you already know everything. Bob Lewis

jayel86

I HIGHLY doubt that. Avid hunters know nothing about nature. only how to demonize and destroy it. Dogs are better beings then most hunters. :p

gabrielshorn2013

Oh please jayel, most hunters are conservationists. The Pittman-Robertson Act, initiated by hunters, mandates that a portion of every sale of hunting gear, be mandated toward wildlife conservation.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pittman%E2%80%93Robertson_Federal_Aid_in_Wildlife_Restoration_Act

KellyAlzan

Bottom line - coyotes are pack animals.

Greg F

Oh wise guru of the canine world, how doth thou knoweth what mine chihuahua wants when he goes to Taco Bell?

jsklinelga

fjulia

My first thought was of fishing tournaments. Will they be next"? I do not hunt anymore but I do enjoy the fishing tournaments. Whether it is the deer population, turkeys, crabs, or Rockfish etc. the DNR does an excellent job of controlling and sustaining animal populations.This should be their jurisdiction not a politician infringing on other's rights for political posturing. And coyote fur is excellent. My arctic survival gear from the Alaska pipeline had a hood lined with coyote fur. The best.

hayduke2

Then raise them sustainably and move on. Synthetic materials, made from recycled plastic, are also available. Fishing tournaments are not about HOW MANY fish you catch, they are about SIZE.

Alice Jones

They can't move on hay. It's like their obsession with hillary.

jayel86

Gabriel, hunting isn't even necessary beyond deer season, and with all the meat in the supermarkets, you have to enjoy killing to be considered avid. This law is important, animals are innocent, people are not.

gabrielshorn2013

If you don't like hunting jayel, don't do it. Simple. Hunting provides the revenue for conservation programs. Not all of our food need come from the supermarket, and as long as I can, I will hunt and fish, and eat what i get. As far as contests, no, I don't support them, except for invasive species like coyotes or nutria.

jayel86

Fair

DickD

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coyote"The basic social unit of a coyote pack is a family containing a reproductive female. However, unrelated coyotes may join forces for companionship, or to bring down prey too large to attack singly. Such "non family" packs are only temporary, and may consist of bachelor males, non reproductive females and sub adult young. "

Greg F

Coyotes can and do often work together. Except for one that works diligently to get that roadrunner.

gabrielshorn2013

Beep-Beep!!

Frayou

5 states out of all the US. What does this suggest? With all the conflicts and protest around us in this day, I sometimes feel people just have too much time on their hands, politicians included, paying too much attention to what everyone else is doing rather than dealing with their own everyday need. Use to be people were too busy working to provide a home and feed their families to be concern about everyone else business, habits, or preferences. Too much time and money.

fnpzwack

Red foxes are not a native species. They are overpopulated, and are largely responsible for the decline of wild turkeys.

lewisantq

Red foxes are native. Their primary prey are mice, rats and rabbits. Bob Lewis

KellyAlzan

Foxes do eat young wild turkeys. And that’s a fact.

jayel86

So what.? Turkeys will never go extinct.

gabrielshorn2013

Neither will foxes or coyotes jayel. What's your point?

jayel86

Gab, they will if this sport continues.

gabrielshorn2013

No, they won't. This is pest control of apex predators, without which, they will continue to multiply and kill other species.

snallygaster

Maryland's DNR website says the red fox is native to MD. Perhaps you're thinking of the coyote.

kaihagen

You made three points in two sentences, and they were all wrong.

lewisantq

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KellyAlzan

You are also wrong Kye. Foxes DO eat young wild turkeys.

gabrielshorn2013

And quail, and pheasants too. Ever since the fox population boom 15-20 years ago, they're all gone.

hayduke2

fnpz - when you post misinformation, it does nothing to aid your argument.

KellyAlzan

Pretty sure no he / she is ok with that. Some of ya’ll are very uptight

DickD

https://dnr.maryland.gov/wildlife/Pages/plants_wildlife/Red_Fox.aspx The red fox is found in North America from the Arctic Circle to well into Central America. It has a slender body, long legs, a slim muzzle, upright triangular ears and a bushy tail, usually tipped in white. Gray foxes can also be found in Maryland, and they tend to have a black tipped tail. Gray foxes also tend to be smaller than red foxes.

jayel86

Foxes are rare, Turkeys are not. There is no over population of foxes.

gabrielshorn2013

Got a citationfor that statement jayel? Foxes are not rare. Not by a longshot.

jayel86

There is nothing on the Maryland dnr site to suggest the red fox is over populated. That's just an excuse to go kill innocent animals. I'm really disappointed in people from this area.

gabrielshorn2013

That wasn't your statement. You said foxes were rare. They are not. They are abundant, and their numbers have been increasing for about 20 years.

KellyAlzan

Karen knows nothing about how vicious coyotes are.

They kill dogs. Large dogs, old dogs,

Small dogs, young dogs. They kill deer. They kill livestock. I’m speaking from firsthand personal knowledge.

Karen really needs to do some learning on the matter.

marinick1

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DickD

Never stopped Karen before, Kelly. Ignorance is bliss!

gabrielshorn2013

Although I'm not a fan of "sport hunts", coyotes are an invasive species, moving from the Western states, eastward. Coyotes are now attacking livestock and pets. Let's allow the DNR to weigh in on this issue before Karen Young horns in with her typical knee-jerk approach.

marinick1

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DickD

You can add foxes, racoons and woodchucks (Groundhogs to Marylanders), too, Gabe

gabrielshorn2013

Agreed Dick, but those are all native animals. Coyotes are not, but they are adapting quite well to this region, even suburbs and urban areas.

lewisantq

gabrielshorn, A minor point, coyotes evolved in North America from a common ancestor with wolves thousands of years ago. Although they have enlarged their range, "Invasive species" is not the best description. Coyotes don't mixed well with wolves and were probably driven out of the East onto the western plains by the arrival of wolves, which evolved in Eurasia.

gabrielshorn2013

nonetheless, they have not been on the east coast for thousands of years, and the ecosystem has adapted to not having them here. That makes their new introduction "invasive". When we decimated the wolf populations, it made it safe for coyotes to migrate east.

lewisantq

Agree to disagree. You say invasive. I say reclaiming their historic territory. Bob

gabrielshorn2013

Sure. However, the University of Maryland thinks differently.

"Because of this, the immigration of the coyote in Maryland does not represent a return of a species once present during historic times. Rather, it is considered a new species in the East."

https://extension.umd.edu/hgic/topics/coyotes

KellyAlzan

I once read that MD was the last state the coyotes move into. I believe may have read that on MD’s DNR website

hayduke2

From NPS - Coyotes are newcomers to the Northeast. The first ones were spotted in the mid-to-late 1940's, and it took until the 1970's for them to become widespread. Today, the eastern coyote (one of 19 subspecies of the animal) inhabits the entire east coast stretching as far west as Ohio. NOT invasive by definition.

gabrielshorn2013

NPS? What is that? Got a link?

hayduke2

They are not an invasive species. They are native to north America. Has their range expanded, yes, but that does not make them invasive.

gabrielshorn2013

Well, what do you term invasive then hay?

From USDA "An invasive species is defined as a species that is 1) non-native (or alien) to the ecosystem under consideration and 2) whose introduction causes or is likely to cause economic or environmental harm or harm to human health.

https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/ct/technical/ecoscience/invasive/?cid=nrcs142p2_011124

From the US Forest Service: "Invasive species have two main characteristics: they are non-native (exotic/alien) to the ecosystem that they occupy, and their existence in that ecosystem causes or is likely to cause harm to the economy, environment, or human health. If left unchecked, invasive species can threaten native species, biodiversity, ecosystem services, recreation, water resources, agricultural and forest production, cultural resources, economies and property values, public safety, and infrastructure".

https://www.fs.usda.gov/managing-land/invasive-species

And from the US Fish & Wildlife Service: "An invasive species is one that is not native to an ecosystem and which causes, or is likely to cause, economic or environmental harm or harm to human health. It is important to note that when we talk about a species being invasive, we are talking about environmental boundaries, not political ones. In addition to the many invasive species from outside the U.S., there are many species from within the U.S. that are invasive in other parts of the country."

https://www.fws.gov/invasives/

lewisantq

Gab. Its great that you reference USDA documents but interpretation is critical and the fact is that the USDA does not list the coyote as an invasive species. It is native to the greater ecosystem and it expansion into neighboring areas is natural. Bob Lewis

lewisantq

Gab, Another point - Studies have determined that coyotes were present in New York and Pennsylvania two hundred years ago so they were native to those East Coast states, another reason they are not labeled an invasive species.

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