Work began to rehabilitate and restore a 180-year-old school house in Rocky Springs, a nonprofit organization announced.

Historic Rocky Springs Chapel, Inc., the nonprofit organization that owns Rocky Springs School House, announced that stabilization work on the school house is underway.

The project is Phase I of a multi-phase project to rehabilitate and restore the school to its original appearance and be used as a public center for historical interpretation and research about the history of the school and the people who used it.

The $27,000 project is funded by grants from The T. Rowe Price Program for Charitable Giving through the Don Mackenzie Charitable Gift Fund, the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority, administered by the Maryland Historical Trust, an agency of the Maryland Department of Planning, Delaplaine Foundation, Inc., a private family foundation based in Frederick, Maryland, The Community Foundation of Frederick County, MD (through the Historic Preservation Field of Interest Fund), the Country School Association of America, headquartered in League City, Texas, and individual donors, according to a release from the organization.

Phase one, which is performed by Fitzgerald’s Heavy Timber Construction, includes the recording and documentation of the original roof structure and replacing with a rubber roof on top of school’s stone walls.

The work performed during this phase of the project will prevent further deterioration of the school house while Historic Rocky Spring Chapel aims to raise an additional $200,000 needed to completely rehabilitate the school.

Rocky Springs School House, 7817 Rocky Springs Road in Frederick, is listed on the Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties. Built in 1839, it is one of the oldest remaining one-room schools in Maryland and still stands at its original location.

The school functioned as a Frederick County Public School from 1839-1930, serving as the seat of learning for generations of local farm children.

Built for both school and sanctuary purposes, the building served as a public school and house of worship for more than 40 years. In 1882, the Church of the United Brethren in Christ congregation built the Rocky Springs Chapel next door.

The school is also the documented site of a Civil War skirmish that occurred on July 8, 1864, between the Eighth Illinois Cavalry of the Union and the First and Second Maryland Cavalries of the Confederacy, killing and wounding several men and horses. A Civil War Trails market next to the school house interprets gives information of the school’s history for the public.

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Allen Etzler is a city editor at the Frederick News-Post. He can be reached at aetzler@newspost.com.

(5) comments

KR999

Oh, and it's "marker," not "market!"

KR999

"A Civil War Trails market next to the school house 'interprets' 'gives' information of the school’s history for the public?" When the hell is the FNP ever going to train their writers to proof read what they write??? Childish, unprofessional journalism at its best.

KR999

I'm guessing the action of July 8th were the opposing cavalry forces probing for the armies of each other prior to the battle the following day.

DickD

You are probably right. This link will show a map of the armies. None real close to the school, but all armies have groups out picking up information.

https://www.battlefields.org/learn/maps/battle-monocacy-july-9-1864

KR999

Thanks Dick, but the map you referenced is only for the engagement of 7.09.1864. And it was generated for the Trust that I've been a member of since 1989. That Trust began as The Association For The Preservation Of Civil War Sites and has evolved into the present day American Battlefields Trust, so I've seen this map before, quite a while ago. I believe the map in this link shows the movements of the armies during the Maryland Campaign of 1864 a bit better. Note that one of the original objectives was the liberation of Confederate prisoners held at Point Lookout:

https://www.essentialcivilwarcurriculum.com/jubal-earlys-1864-raid-on-washington.html

And, by the way, the proper military terminology is all armies had 'patrols' out gathering information, not "groups."

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