BG City Flood Cleanup - HM

YMCA representatives estimated nearly half a million dollars in damage at the YMCA of Frederick County on North Market Street by flooding during severe storms last May.

It was a rainy 2018 in Frederick County and in the state as a whole.

Reporting locations at both Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport and Ronald Reagan Washington National Airport reported the wettest year on record, according to the National Weather Service.

BWI recorded 63.01 inches of precipitation by Nov. 15, according to the weather service, breaking the record set in 2003. Reagan National saw 61.34 inches on Dec. 15, breaking the record set in 1889, according to the weather service.

Washington Dulles International Airport had 41.06 inches of precipitation as of Dec. 26, said meteorologist Howard Silverman. That was 24 inches above normal.

Due to the partial shutdown of the federal government, specific totals for Frederick County were not available.

With the rain and a few other weather events including a tornado, communities across the county spent a good portion of the spring and summer cleaning up after damaging storms.

Town and city estimates include only damage to municipal property, not to individual residences.

Frederick County as a whole

The May flooding event was declared a disaster so the county could apply for reimbursement from the Federal Emergency Management Agency, said Vivian Laxton, Frederick County government communications director.

The county filed for $433,000 with FEMA for the May event, of which 75 percent could be reimbursed. That would be about $324,750, Laxton said.

So far, the county has received just over $53,000 in reimbursement. Due to the partial shutdown of the federal government, FEMA cannot currently process reimbursements.

Brunswick

Brunswick was hit with two 100-year floods in May, causing damage to the city and some residential properties, said City Administrator David Dunn.

Martin’s Creek overflowed due to the rain, causing it to wash away part of the public works yard. It also damaged a rock wall.

The city has applied for FEMA reimbursement, which can cover up to 75 percent of requested money, Dunn said.

That will help cover the damage to the public works yard and a park. It will not cover the rock wall, which will likely cost the city more than $100,000 to fix, he said. The city is requesting money from the governor’s office.

The city was also responsible for $52,000 in equipment parts ruined by the floodwater and $30,000 to remove mold from one of the city’s buildings, Dunn said.

Several homes along Martin’s Creek had backyards washed away, he said. The city will talk to the finance committee about a program to help those residents.

Burkittsville

With the rainy May, there was road damage in Burkittsville, Mayor Debby Burgoyne said.

The town applied for FEMA reimbursement, Burgoyne said, which will hopefully reimburse them 75 percent.

“But we can’t afford the other 25 percent,” she said.

The town is small, she said, and doesn’t have a public works department. She’s hoping that they’ll be able to rely on some of the talent from residents to help fix damage they might not be able to afford, she said.

Emmitsburg

Town Manager Cathy Willets and Mayor Donald Briggs did not respond to requests for comment.

Frederick

The city submitted an initial damage estimate of $1.8 million to FEMA due to weather-related damage, Mayor Michael O’Connor said in an email.

Up to 75 percent is eligible for FEMA reimbursement.

There has been no budget impact from weather-related damage, O’Connor said.

Middletown

Middletown did not have any damage that needed FEMA reimbursement, said Andrew Bowen, town administrator. There was some typical storm debris that required cleanup, but that was covered by the town’s budget.

“We were very, very lucky,” Bowen said.

Mount Airy

Despite having a tornado blow through in November, the town did not have any property damage, Town Manager Monika Weierbach said in an email.

The damage was all to private property, she said, adding that she did not think the town kept totals of private damage.

Myersville

Representatives from Myersville did not return requests for comment.

New Market

New Market saw a lot of trees down and water in back alleys due to the rain, Mayor Winslow F. Burhans III said.

There was no damage to town structures, he said. They did not seek FEMA reimbursement for any of the cleanup.

“I think it just ate up what we had,” Burhans said.

Rosemont

There was no damage to Rosemont property, Burgess Thomas Watson said. There was damage to the park behind the Lions Club and some water in the Lions Club building, but that was handled by the organization, he said.

Watson said he had never seen such bad rain in Rosemont.

“First time I saw that little Catoctin Creek get that high,” Watson said.

Thurmont

There was some flooding on the streets of Thurmont, Mayor John Kinnaird said, but the town only had to clean the streets.

The town covered the expense with its budget.

The ground was saturated from the rain, which increased flooding, Kinnaird said. According to the National Weather Service, there was 16.73 inches of precipitation in July at BWI in 2018. That was a little more than 9 inches more than in 2017. The norm for July, according to the weather service, is 4.07 inches.

Walkersville

There was no damage in Walkersville, Burgess Chad Weddle said.

“And we were lucky,” he said.

Although they did not have damage in 2018, Weddle said he is nervous about the winter in early 2019. So far, it has just been rain. But if it turns to snow, Walkersville could be in trouble, he said.

Woodsboro

Woodsboro had minimal weather-related damage, Burgess Bill Rittelmeyer said.

Woodsboro Regional Park, which has a creek running through it, has flooded nearly every week, he said, which has caused problems for the park.

“Fortunately for us, no real big damage, but certainly a big inconvenience for users of the park in trying to cut the grass and maintain the park,” Rittelmeyer said.

Follow Heather Mongilio on Twitter: @HMongilio.

Heather Mongilio is the health and Fort Detrick reporter for the Frederick News-Post. She can be reached at hmongilio@newspost.com.

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