The Trump administration is seeking to restore the citizenship question to the 2020 U.S. Census even after the Supreme Court ruled against it and the commerce secretary said the effort to do so would be dropped. The legality and practicality of this decision are unclear, and a federal judge has given the White House a Friday afternoon deadline to explain how it intends to proceed, but I would like to step back and consider some basic questions about this rather embarrassing debacle.

Even if you are pro-immigration, as I am, I believe you should favor asking U.S. residents whether they are citizens when the population is counted.

Unlike many of those who are pushing for the question, I would like to boost the flow of legal immigration by a factor of two or three. Nonetheless, are we supposed to let foreigners in (which I favor), and give them a rapid path to citizenship (which I also favor), but somehow we are not allowed to ask them if they are citizens? To me this boggles the mind.

The U.S. asked a citizenship question on the Census starting in 1820 and up until 1950, so it is hard to argue that the idea is unacceptable altogether.

I do understand the following realities. First, asking about citizenship information will make the Census less reliable, as fewer people will respond, typically immigrants but also including some actual citizens and legal permanent residents. An accurate Census has pragmatic value for economic policymaking and also for research. Perhaps most importantly for the current debate, asking about citizenship will lead to a recalculation of electoral districts in a manner that will favor the Republican Party (Latinos are likely to respond at lower rates, and that will apportion less representation to Democratic-leaning areas). It would also reallocate federal dollars away from Democratic-leaning areas.

If you are a Democrat, a Never Trumper, or perhaps just appalled by the partisan Republican motives behind the move to add the citizenship question, I probably cannot convince you that it’s a good idea. Nonetheless, I would like to suggest another way of framing the debate, one which might at least make you less negative if the question somehow finds its way back on the Census, either in 2020 or beyond.

Do you really wish for your view to be so closely affiliated with the attitude that citizenship is a thing to hide? I would be embarrassed if my own political strategy implied that I take a firm view — backed by strong moralizing — that we not ask people about their citizenship on the Census form. I would think somehow I was, if only in the longer run, making a huge political blunder to so rest the fate of my party on insisting on not asking people about their citizenship.

Not asking about citizenship seems to signify an attitude toward immigrants something like this: Get them in and across the border, their status may be mixed and their existence may be furtive, and let’s not talk too openly about what is going on, and later we will try to get all of them citizenship. Given the current disagreement between the two parties on immigration questions, that may well be the only way of getting more immigrants into the U.S., which I hold to be a desirable goal. But that is a dangerous choice of political turf, and it may not help the pro-immigration cause in the longer run.

The rationalist in me prefers an open debate about letting more people in legally. Countries that do let in especially high percentages of legal immigrants, such as Canada and Australia, take pretty tough stances in controlling their borders. Both of those countries ask about citizenship on their censuses. When citizens feel in control of the process, they may be more generous in terms of opening the border.

The U.S. needs more immigrants for reasons that stretch from the cultural to the fiscal to the economic. But as long as it keeps taking in immigrants in torturous and not entirely legal ways, the debate over higher legal immigration will continue to founder. Americans won’t confront the need to raise the legal quotas because the illegal arrivals are an imperfect substitute.

The immigration debate would go better if the focus could shift to legal, publicly recognized rights to citizenship, later to be declared openly in response to governmental inquiries. I would like to see the pro-immigration party — today the Democrats — embrace this shift.

Even if in the short run they lose some seats, give up some federal dollars, and have to accept a whacking to their pride.

Cowen is a Bloomberg Opinion columnist. He is a professor of economics at George Mason University and writes for the blog Marginal Revolution.

(107) comments

public-redux

gabriel, Not to say “I told you so” but the prez said we could get better info on the number of illegal immigrants by NOT asking about it on the census. And lo and behold, the ACS figures prominently in that conclusion.

gabrielshorn2013

Point conceded public. My point was that the question needed to be asked. It seemed that the opinion of many is that it should not be asked at all. "If you don't take a temperature, you can't find a fever"

phydeaux994

gab, what names do I call you and others with regularity? When I called you a racist what was your comment that I responded to. (definition of a racist: someone who believes their race is superior to another or some others or all others). Anyone of any race can be a racist. You cannot be a racist to your own race.

gabrielshorn2013

We were discussing gun violence in Chicago phy, and I said that it is mostly an inner city issue. You retorted that I am blaming poor black people, when I clearly was talking about gang violence. You wouldn't let it go, even after I relayed the well known fact that there are many violent ethnic gangs, including Russians, Albanians, Ukranians. You kept insisting that I really meant black people, when I clearly did not. Ring a bell?

phydeaux994

I do remember that discussion. I stand by my statement based on your inner city statement. 10 out of 10 people would think inner city=poor Black people. I can never remember any discussion about Russian, Albanian, Ukrainian gangs in Chicago or any U.S. City. Besides, you can consider your race superior to Slavs.

public-redux

I know someone who ironically refers to “urban Americans”, by which he means blacks.

gabrielshorn2013

And I stand by mine ofay.

rikkitikkitavvi

According to you ducky and lame stream media he accomplished nothing. Here is the website I got it from. Yeah I know not as "respectable" as the never Trump channels. Snark https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/washington-secrets/trumps-list-289-accomplishments-in-just-20-months-relentless-promise-keeping

public-redux

Oh, I thought you composed that yourself.

public-redux

Hey everyone, it is easy to insert line breaks using a simple code. Put the letters br in between the “less than” symbol symbol. Those symbols and letters will not be visible in your comment. “Br” is short for “break”. I’m going to use that code right here to create a new paragraph:

Isn’t that nice?

So, first you type this: Then type this: br

Then type this: >

gabrielshorn2013

Public, br> Br> Thank You!br> Br> Gabriel

gabrielshorn2013

Must not work for Android phones. [sad]

public-redux

I think I did something wrong in my final example. It is HTML and ought to work on an Android. The basic format is "less than symbol" "a code goes here" "greater than symbol" Most HTML codes have a beginning and an end and the stuff in the middle is affected. The closing tag is the "less than symbol" a forward slash "the code" "greater than symbol"

Just look up HTML codes online.

b is the code for bolding text. i is the code for italic text. b and i used in concert are the codes for bold italic text. sup is the code for superscript. And there are more. For

gabrielshorn2013

Thanks public!!!



Gabriel

public-redux

De nada.

public-redux

Gabe, I’m starting a new comment up here for all of our benefits.

I believe you are conflating two separate issues. One issue is the accuracy of the census. The other issue is knowing how many people here are (are not) citizens. I want both. But I don’t want to sacrifice the former to obtain the latter. The CB has concluded that the citizenship question will result in an inaccurate count. I have yet to see anyone dispute this (especially not the Trump administration which appears to agree wholeheartedly). And, as it has been observed, the CB does other surveys. We can get the citizenship information without skewing the census. I have yet to see anyone suggest that statistical analyses of properly selected samples are invalid. I can tell you understand that.

So I’ll rephrase my question: If the citizenship question would reduce the accuracy of the census and we can get that information in other ways, why include it on the census?

gabrielshorn2013

Thanks for restarting the thread public. It was becoming a drag to find the comments and proper response button. I agree, but if and only if, we can obtain that information elsewhere. In that case, the census should be a paid reply card asking one question "how many people reside at your residence". I have yet to see how the other data would be obtained. It is critical to understand the effects of immigration, legal and illegal, on the US economy and the low skilled workforce. If as Democrat Jeffrey Wang states, that half of the current low skilled jobs will disappear in 25 years or so, we need to start planning now. Our current social nets will not support that population. Of interest is also the effect of illegal aliens on the census, and thereby representation in Congress. Since the number of representatives per state is determined by the census results every 10 years, illegal immigration can skew those numbers, resulting in those aliens having a voice in our laws, taxes, and spending. Was the intent of the census to allow that to happen? If you recall, there was a debate in the early days of our country regarding counting slaves. The Southern states wanted to count all slaves as a person, but the Northern states saw that it would give the South an "unfair advantage " in Congress. They came up with the 3/5 Compromise to settle the issue. Isn't this what we're seeing here with Democrats taking the part of the South, and Republicans taking the part of the North?

public-redux

The postcard argument assumes, does it not, that every question beyond the number of residents will lead to skewed results. That may or may not be the case. I haven't seen an argument suggesting, for example, that asking if the residence is a house, an apartment, or a mobile home leads to undercounting or skewed results. So I don't think it necessarily follows that the census should ask either 1 question only or any number of questions with no regard to their subject. It appears that what is being asked about has some relevance to the accuracy of the count. You seem to be trying to squeeze an all or nothing argument into a much more nuanced situation.

" I have yet to see how the other data would be obtained." Well, one way might be to ask the question on the American Community Survey that the CB does every single year and then extrapolate the data using statistical modeling. The

I'm sympathetic to the argument that we shouldn't count illegal immigrants for apportioning representatives. The way to change that is to amend the constitution as we did for slaves. In the meantime, the constitution says count the number of persons.

public-redux

So I screwed up the link code. (which by the way, is "a") Looks like I fat-fingered the closing tag. The hypertext goes to the ACS page that explains why the CB asks about citizenship on the ACS.

rikkitikkitavvi

Libbies point of view. It 's okay to leave borders open and let unlimited illegal aliens into the nation unfettered. It's okay for the country to then pay to feed, clothe and educate the illegals, even more so than actual US citizens. Tax cuts are somehow greedy and damaging to the country. Conservatives are more dangerous than terrorists. A person's sex is whatever he or she thinks it is at any given point in time, and it's always changing. A baby who is actually born alive can still be killed if the mother chooses. Guns are the reason people are murdered. Successful people should be ashamed of themselves, unless that success came through government. Anyone who holds views that are different than liberals is inherently racist, sexist, greedy and uncaring. Being poor is inherently noble. Opinions that are different than the ones held by liberals should be silenced. Communism is actually a great system, it just hasn't been implemented correctly. All of these notions are just common sense.

rikkitikkitavvi

To recap, during the debates, Democrat candidates supported: Reparations for slavery (which was abolished over 150 years ago) Decriminalize illegal immigration (ie. Open Borders) Government-funded healthcare for all illegal aliens Single-payer healthcare for everyone Ending private health insurance Government-funded college tuition Forced busing to combat de facto segregation Transgender rights as the new civil rights movement Identity politics Government-funded Abortion on demand, without apology, even for biological men Tax hikes! Increasing regulation on everything The Green New Deal which calls for banning cows, banning cars, and retrofitting every building in America.

public-redux

I’m more than a little disappointed that four SCOTUS justices don’t mind being lied to. That does not bode well.

CB should omit the citizenship question from the decennial census in the interest of accuracy and include it on its other studies so we can get the information.

veritas

PR... If ever you were baptized, my guess is it was in the Sea of Ambivalence. Oh no... did I just open the response door for a diatribe against spirituality and/or religion?

public-redux

You are too clever for me. Perhaps you will explain your meaning.

phydeaux994

To he!! with the Constitution. To he!! with the Rule of Law. To he!! with the Supreme Court and Congress. Anything that Trump wants to do to keep non-Whites, legal and illegal, out of our Country is good. It’s why we went to his Trump Rally’s. It’s why the Minority of Voters Elected him. Racism, Hate, and Lies have, with Russia’s Cyber Help of course, divided our Country. Divide and Conquer. Trump and the Republicans are destroying America’s progress of the last 100 years. If they succeed in reversing a SCOTUS Ruling, our Founding Fathers have failed, America has failed. Russia has succeeded in their 75 year quest to defeat us without firing a shot.

gabrielshorn2013

Hyperbole phy.

jsklinelga

gabrielshorn Hyperbole is an understatement. The Constitution and the rule of law are what people are seeking. SCOTUS was borderline in overstepping their authority but made a reasonable administrative point. Yes it is within the President's authority to place the citizenship question on the census but the reasoning proffered in answering the suit was poorly crafted. The President most likely will have the question included and the only reason he needs is: it falls within his executive authority and has an established precedence.

gabrielshorn2013

Agreed jsk. In 2000, question 13 asked if the respondent was a citizen of the US. https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/2000_1.html. Remind me again who was President in 2000? It wasn’t on the census form in 2010. So we skipped one census cycle with that question, and somehow it is unconstitutional, immoral, or illegal? Why?

public-redux

Gabe, that was on the long form which went to a sampling of the population. Who knows, that may have been how the CB learned that that particular question led to a significantly inaccurate population count.

public-redux

“...poorly crafted.”

I’m reminded of Twain’s advice to youth that a well-crafted lie has as much truth in it as possible. Given the whopper they told in court, the Trump administration appears to have lot to learn about lying. Which is odd, given that it lies religiously.

gabrielshorn2013

Public, nonetheless it was a valid and legal question then. It seems insincere for the left to object to the question now, calling the current administration racist, when it was appropriate in the Clinton administration.

public-redux

Gabe, It is possible that neither the left nor the right regard Clinton and Trump as interchangeable.

gabrielshorn2013

Jeez phy, here we go. “you and jsk and CD have told me how stupid and wrong my statements are but never tell me why.“ I have never called you anything other than your name phy, other than calling you ofay after you called me a racist. Never once called you stupid. On the other hand, you call people names with regularly. As far as responding to you the other night, I went to bed. It is not my job to entertain you until you’re ready to stop. Also, please note your tone in the post that I am now responding to. You’re dismissive of the things I said, including my heritage. Finally, I never lose my temper. You infer what was never stated or implied, which seems to be your MO.

gabrielshorn2013

“You lost your temper and said I called you names and had called you a racist in the past and that you were a Cajun and not a Republican and some other stuff.“ I didn’t say I was a Cajun phy. Please read for comprehension. I said that my heritage was Cajun Creole, not Cajun. If you don’t know the difference, creole are multi racial, including black African, Caucasian, and Native American. Please look it up. Again, I never lost my temper in this forum. More transference on your part. As for my politics, I’m a Libertarian, who has political opinions in both camps. Finally, if you don’t want people commenting on your opinions here, don’t post them here. Easy peasey, right?

gabrielshorn2013

Public asked "Gabe, If the citizenship question on the short form would reduce the accuracy of census, would you still want it included? If so, why?" If we want to know the true level of non-citizens in the US, how do we measure it? The question isn't "are you an illegal alien?" It asks if the respondents are citizens. They may hold valid visas, or be green card holders too. If they chose to respond "no", they may still chose to not disclose their states as a visa or green card holder, or illegal alien. Although portrayed as anti-Hispanic, this also includes the 40% of illegal aliens that overstay visas. The data could be used by the Department of Commerce, and Department of labor to determine the effects of migration, both legal and illegal, on business and employment of low-skilled workers. As for the latter, that job market will continue to shrink as automation continues to displace workers. The government needs to understand this in order to plan for the future. This is a concern of Jeffrey Wang, a Democrat running for President in 2020. There doesn't seem to de an understanding of this issue, or a plan to deal with it by any political party at this time. As I told phy, if you don't take a temperature, you won't find a fever.

hayduke2

Hey rikki - why did you feel the need to copy the information from Trump's 2020 website and post the entire thing? I am sure that this political tool wasn't designed to cast the inept and chaotic presidency in a positive light.

Comment deleted.
gabrielshorn2013

Sigh...yes, hyperbolic rhetoric phy. This article was about immigration, and the addition of a citizenship question to the census. Your comment(s) are off topic. The citizenship question was on the long form back in 2000 (question 13), and was valid then. The long form was used to do a statistical sampling of 17% of the households (mine was one of them) to do make inferences about the rest of the population. Statistical samplings (a.k.a. polls) are done all the time by government agencies. I thoroughly understand that the role of the census, as described in the Constitution is to count everyone in the country as best as the government. That singular purpose could be fulfilled with a postcard saying "fill in the number of people living in your house today", and that would be the end of it. But no, the government uses the census for many other purposes. My opinion is that a citizenship question is fair to determine as best we can the actual cost of providing goods and services to undocumented aliens. You can't diagnose a fever if you don't take a temperature, right? If there is no significant impact to the economy, or joblessness among low-skilled workers, then that would put the issue to rest. To me, that is a valid question which should interest the Department of Commerce and Department of Labor. If you object to citizenship questions, how about race? That was question 9 on the short form in 2010. How about if you are of Hispanic origin? That was question 8 on the short form in 2010. What business is that of the government? The Census bureau did away with the long form in 2010, for whatever reason, but another agency administers the long form separately. There is no reason that they could not re-institute it if they wished, and send it out to everyone. I do not support Donald Trump. Never have, never will. If you have been paying attention, you would have read that I did not vote for him because I knew all about him from my time growing up in NJ. 2016 was the first election that I missed since turning 18. A HS friend worked for him after grad school, but quit after a year saying "what an a-hole". Sound familiar yet? Does that put your claims that I am a Trump supporter to rest finally? I just am not afflicted with Trump Derangement Syndrome (TDS), and Trump Tourette's Syndrome (TTS) like several on this forum are, including you. My crew? Don't have one. I'm not even a Republican. Yes, the economy has been going up slowly since 2009, thanks to government policy since the meltdown. Was it all BHO, a combination of BHO, and Congress, BHO, Congress, and business? Probably the latter. Certainly, DJT has not sunk the ship, but does he get no credit for maintaining the momentum? Has he made my life better? Dunno, but I don't think he has made it any worse either. Any more questions?

Comment deleted.
phydeaux994

Your comments that I have read have never condemned Don for anything. Support by omission. The Citizenship question was never used to track you down, arrest you, and deport you before. That is the perception of the Hispanic Community, legal and illegal. Millions will not fill out the form. That will defeat the purpose of the Census, to count the number of residents living in the United States. I think there should be a question on the Census about gun ownership. I think the majority of voters would support that. Peace!

Comment deleted.
gabrielshorn2013

Impressive list rikki. I wonder if phy will take the time to refute each point as he expects us to do with his statements. Whataya say phy?

Comment deleted.
rikkitikkitavvi

ATTABOY! MAGA Trump in a landslide 2020! [wink]

Comment deleted.
public-redux

Gabe, If the citizenship question on the short form would reduce the accuracy of census, would you still want it included? If so, why?

Comment deleted.
gabrielshorn2013

"Support by omission." Ah, I get it now, the old "if you're not with us, you're against us" line of binary thinking. Got it. And, um...wrong.

Comment deleted.
gabrielshorn2013

Looks like you are right rikki, gone! Ok FNP moderator, what rule below did nikki's post violate?

Comment deleted.
phydeaux994

Hey gab, at 8:11 pm last night I expressed my opinion of the disaster our Country is experiencing. It was addressed to no one in particular and did not ask for a response. But you challenged my OPINION and the ensuing repartee resulted. I just noted that you and jsk and CD have told me how stupid and wrong my statements are but never tell me why. So I ask why. At that point you guys lose your tempers and attack me. This same thing happened between us in our discussion a couple days ago. You lost your temper and said I called you names and had called you a racist in the past and that you were a Cajun and not a Republican and some other stuff. I responded but never heard back. As usual with your posse. Just watch a baseball game, it will calm you down.

Comment deleted.
rikkitikkitavvi

conomic Growth 4.2 percent growth in the second quarter of 2018. For the first time in more than a decade, growth is projected to exceed 3 percent over the calendar year. Jobs 4 million new jobs have been created since the election, and more than 3.5 million since Trump took office. More Americans are employed now than ever before in our history. Jobless claims at lowest level in nearly five decades. The economy has achieved the longest positive job-growth streak on record. Job openings are at an all-time high and outnumber job seekers for the first time on record. Unemployment claims at 50 year low African-American, Hispanic, and Asian-American unemployment rates have all recently reached record lows. African-American unemployment hit a record low of 5.9 percent in May 2018. Hispanic unemployment at 4.5 percent. Asian-American unemployment at record low of 2 percent. Women’s unemployment recently at lowest rate in nearly 65 years. Female unemployment dropped to 3.6 percent in May 2018, the lowest since October 1953. Youth unemployment recently reached its lowest level in more than 50 years. July 2018’s youth unemployment rate of 9.2 percent was the lowest since July 1966. Veterans’ unemployment recently hit its lowest level in nearly two decades. July 2018’s veterans’ unemployment rate of 3.0 percent matched the lowest rate since May 2001. Unemployment rate for Americans without a high school diploma recently reached a record low. Rate for disabled Americans recently hit a record low. Blue-collar jobs recently grew at the fastest rate in more than three decades. Poll found that 85 percent of blue-collar workers believe their lives are headed “in the right direction.” 68 percent reported receiving a pay increase in the past year. Last year, job satisfaction among American workers hit its highest level since 2005. Nearly two-thirds of Americans rate now as a good time to find a quality job. Optimism about the availability of good jobs has grown by 25 percent. Added more than 400,000 manufacturing jobs since the election. Manufacturing employment is growing at its fastest pace in more than two decades. 100,000 new jobs supporting the production & transport of oil & natural gas. American Income Median household income rose to $61,372 in 2017, a post-recession high. Wages up in August by their fastest rate since June 2009. Paychecks rose by 3.3 percent between 2016 and 2017, the most in a decade. Council of Economic Advisers found that real wage compensation has grown by 1.4 percent over the past year. Some 3.9 million Americans off food stamps since the election. Median income for Hispanic-Americans rose by 3.7 percent and surpassed $50,000 for the first time ever in history. Home-ownership among Hispanics is at the highest rate in nearly a decade. Poverty rates for African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans have reached their lowest levels ever recorded. American Optimism Small business optimism has hit historic highs. NFIB’s small business optimism index broke a 35 year-old record in August. SurveyMonkey/CNBC’s small business confidence survey for Q3 of 2018 matched its all-time high. Manufacturers are more confident than ever. 95 percent of U.S. manufacturers are optimistic about the future, the highest ever. Consumer confidence is at an 18-year high. 12 percent of Americans rate the economy as the most significant problem facing our country, the lowest level on record. Confidence in the economy is near a two-decade high, with 51 percent rating the economy as good or excellent. American Business Investment is flooding back into the United States due to the tax cuts. Over $450 billion dollars has already poured back into the U.S., including more than $300 billion in the first quarter of 2018. Retail sales have surged. Commerce Department figures from August show that retail sales increased 0.5 percent in July 2018, an increase of 6.4 percent from July 2017. ISM’s index of manufacturing scored its highest reading in 14 years. Worker productivity is the highest it has been in more than three years. Steel and aluminum producers are re-opening. Dow Jones Industrial Average, S&P 500, and NASDAQ have all notched record highs. Dow hit record highs 70 times in 2017 alone, the most ever recorded in one year. Deregulation Achieved massive deregulation at a rapid pace, completing 22 deregulatory actions to every one regulatory action during his first year in office. Signed legislation to roll back costly and harmful provisions of Dodd-Frank, providing relief to credit unions, and community and regional banks. Federal agencies achieved more than $8 billion in lifetime net regulatory cost savings. Rolled back Obama’s burdensome Waters of the U.S. rule. Used the Congressional Review Act to repeal regulations more times than in history. Tax Cuts Biggest tax cuts and reforms in American history by signing the Tax Cuts and Jobs act into law Provided more than $5.5 trillion in gross tax cuts, nearly 60 percent of which will go to families. Increased the exemption for the death tax to help save Family Farms & Small Business. Nearly doubled the standard deduction for individuals and families. Enabled vast majority of American families will be able to file their taxes on a single page by claiming the standard deduction. Doubled the child tax credit to help lessen the financial burden of raising a family. Lowered America’s corporate tax rate from the highest in the developed world to allow American businesses to compete and win. Small businesses can now deduct 20 percent of their business income. Cut dozens of special interest tax breaks and closed loopholes for the wealthy. 9 in 10 American workers are expected see an increase in their paychecks thanks to the tax cuts, according to the Treasury Department. More than 6 million of American workers have received wage increases, bonuses, and increased benefits thanks to tax cuts. Over 100 utility companies have lowered electric, gas, or water rates thanks to the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act. Ernst & Young found 89 percent of companies planned to increase worker compensation thanks to the Trump tax cuts. Established opportunity zones to spur investment in left behind communities. Worker Development Established a National Council for the American Worker to develop a national strategy for training and retraining America’s workers for high-demand industries. Employers have signed Trump’s “Pledge to America’s Workers,” committing to train or retrain more than 4.2 million workers and students. Signed the first Perkins CTE reauthorization since 2006, authorizing more than $1 billion for states each year to fund vocational and career education programs. Executive order expanding apprenticeship opportunities for students and workers. Domestic Infrastructure Proposed infrastructure plan would utilize $200 billion in Federal funds to spur at least $1.5 trillion in infrastructure investment across the country. Executive order expediting environmental reviews and approvals for high priority infrastructure projects. Federal agencies have signed the One Federal Decision Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) streamlining the federal permitting process for infrastructure projects. Rural prosperity task force and signed an executive order to help expand broadband access in rural areas. Health Care Signed an executive order to help minimize the financial burden felt by American households Signed legislation to improve the National Suicide Hotline. Signed the most comprehensive childhood cancer legislation ever into law, which will advance childhood cancer research and improve treatments. Signed Right-to-Try legislation, expanding health care options for terminally ill patients. Enacted changes to the Medicare 340B program, saving seniors an estimated $320 million on drugs in 2018 alone. FDA set a new record for generic drug approvals in 2017, saving consumers nearly $9 billion. Released a blueprint to drive down drug prices for American patients, leading multiple major drug companies to announce they will freeze or reverse price increases. Expanded short-term, limited-duration health plans. Let more employers to form Association Health Plans, enabling more small businesses to join together and affordably provide health insurance to their employees. Cut Obamacare’s burdensome individual mandate penalty. Signed legislation repealing Obamacare’s Independent Payment Advisory Board, also known as the “death panels.” USDA invested more than $1 billion in rural health care in 2017, improving access to health care for 2.5 million people in rural communities across 41 states Proposed Title X rule to help ensure taxpayers do not fund the abortion industry in violation of the law. Reinstated and expanded the Mexico City Policy to keep foreign aid from supporting the global abortion industry. HHS formed a new division over protecting the rights of conscience and religious freedom. Overturned Obama administration’s midnight regulation prohibiting states from defunding certain abortion facilities. Signed executive order to help ensure that religious organizations are not forced to choose between violating their religious beliefs by complying with Obamacare’s contraceptive mandate or shutting their doors. Combating Opioids Chaired meeting the 73rd General Session of the United Nations discussing the worldwide drug problem with international leaders. Initiative to Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand, introducing new measures to keep dangerous drugs out of our communities. $6 billion in new funding to fight the opioid epidemic. DEA conducted a surge in April 2018 that arrested 28 medical professions and revoked 147 registrations for prescribing too many opioids. Brought the “Prescribed to Death” memorial to President’s Park near the White House, helping raise awareness about the human toll of the opioid crisis. Helped reduce high-dose opioid prescriptions by 16 percent in 2017. Opioid Summit on the administration-wide efforts to combat the opioid crisis. Launched a national public awareness campaign about the dangers of opioid addiction. Created a Commission on Combating Drug Addiction and the Opioid Crisis which recommended a number of pathways to tackle the opioid crisis. Led two National Prescription Drug Take Back Days in 2017 and 2018, collecting a record number of expired and unneeded prescription drugs each time. $485 million targeted grants in FY 2017 to help areas hit hardest by the opioid crisis. Signed INTERDICT Act, strengthening efforts to detect and intercept synthetic opioids before they reach our communities. DOJ secured its first-ever indictments against Chinese fentanyl manufacturers. Joint Criminal Opioid Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team, aimed at disrupting online illicit opioid sales. Declared the opioid crisis a Nationwide Public Health Emergency in October 2017. Law and Order More U.S. Circuit Court judges confirmed in the first year in office than ever. Confirmed more than two dozen U. S. Circuit Court judges. Followed through on the promise to nominate judges to the Supreme Court who will adhere to the Constitution Nominated and confirmed Justice Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. Signed an executive order directing the Attorney General to develop a strategy to more effectively prosecute people who commit crimes against law enforcement officers. Launched an evaluation of grant programs to make sure they prioritize the protection and safety of law enforcement officers. Established a task force to reduce crime and restore public safety in communities across Signed an executive order to focus more federal resources on dismantling transnational criminal organizations such as drug cartels. Signed an executive order to focus more federal resources on dismantling transnational criminal organizations such as drug cartels. Violent crime decreased in 2017 according to FBI statistics. $137 million in grants through the COPS Hiring Program to preserve jobs, increase community policing capacities, and support crime prevention efforts. Enhanced and updated the Project Safe Neighborhoods to help reduce violent crime. Signed legislation making it easier to target websites that enable sex trafficking and strengthened penalties for people who promote or facilitate prostitution. Created an interagency task force working around the clock to prosecute traffickers, protect victims, and prevent human trafficking. Conducted Operation Cross Country XI to combat human trafficking, rescuing 84 children and arresting 120 human traffickers. Encouraged federal prosecutors to use the death penalty when possible in the fight against the trafficking of deadly drugs. New rule effectively banning bump stock sales in the United States. Border Security and Immigration Secured $1.6 billion for border wall construction in the March 2018 omnibus bill. Construction of a 14-mile section of border wall began near San Diego. Worked to protect American communities from the threat posed by the vile MS-13 gang. ICE’s Homeland Security Investigations division arrested 796 MS-13 members and associates in FY 2017, an 83 percent increase from the prior year. Justice worked with partners in Central America to secure criminal charges against more than 4,000 MS-13 members. Border Patrol agents arrested 228 illegal aliens affiliated with MS-13 in FY 2017. Fighting to stop the scourge of illegal drugs at our border. ICE HSI seized more than 980,000 pounds of narcotics in FY 2017, including 2,370 pounds of fentanyl and 6,967 pounds of heroin. ICE HSI dedicated nearly 630,000 investigative hours towards halting the illegal import of fentanyl. ICE HSI made 11,691 narcotics-related arrests in FY 2017. Stop Opioid Abuse and Reduce Drug Supply and Demand introduced new measures to keep dangerous drugs out the United States. Signed the INTERDICT Act into law, enhancing efforts to detect and intercept synthetic opioids. DOJ secured its first-ever indictments against Chinese fentanyl manufacturers. DOJ launched their Joint Criminal Opioid Darknet Enforcement (J-CODE) team, aimed at disrupting online illicit opioid sales. Released an immigration framework that includes the resources required to secure our borders and close legal loopholes, and repeatedly called on Congress to fix our broken immigration laws. Authorized the deployment of the National Guard to help secure the border. Enhanced vetting of individuals entering the U.S. from countries that don’t meet security standards, helping to ensure individuals who pose a threat to our country are identified before they enter. These procedures were upheld in a June 2018 Supreme Court hearing. ICE removed over 226,000 illegal aliens from the United States in 2017. ICE rescued or identified over 500 human trafficking victims and over 900 child exploitation victims in 2017 alone. In 2017, ICE Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) arrested more than 127,000 aliens with criminal convictions or charges, responsible for Over 76,000 with dangerous drug offenses. More than 48,000 with assault offenses. More than 11,000 with weapons offenses. More than 5,000 with sexual assault offenses. More than 2,000 with kidnapping offenses. Over 1,800 with homicide offenses. Created the Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement (VOICE) Office in order to support the victims and families affected by illegal alien crime. More than doubled the number of counties participating in the 287(g) program, which allows jails to detain criminal aliens until they are transferred to ICE custody. Trade Negotiating and renegotiating better trade deals, achieving free, fair, and reciprocal trade for the United States. Agreed to work with the European Union towards zero tariffs, zero non-tariff barriers, and zero subsides. Deal with the European Union to increase U.S. energy exports to Europe. Litigated multiple WTO disputes targeting unfair trade practices and upholding our right to enact fair trade laws. Finalized a revised trade agreement with South Korea, which includes provisions to increase American automobile exports. Negotiated an historic U.S.-Mexico-Canada Trade Agreement to replace NAFTA. Agreement to begin trade negotiations for a U.S.-Japan trade agreement. Secured $250 billion in new trade and investment deals in China and $12 billion in Vietnam. Established a Trade and Investment Working Group with the United Kingdom, laying the groundwork for post-Brexit trade. Enacted steel and aluminum tariffs to protect our vital steel and aluminum producers and strengthen our national security. Conducted 82 anti-dumping and countervailing duty investigations in 2017 alone. Confronting China’s unfair trade practices after years of Washington looking the other way. 25 percent tariff on $50 billion of goods imported from China and later imposed an additional 10% tariff on $200 billion of Chinese goods. Conducted an investigation into Chinese forced technology transfers, unfair licensing practices, and intellectual property theft. Imposed safeguard tariffs to protect domestic washing machines and solar products manufacturers hurt by China’s trade policies Withdrew from the job-killing Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP). Secured access to new markets for America’s farmers. Recent deal with Mexico included new improvements enabling food and agriculture to trade more fairly. Recent agreement with the E.U. will reduce barriers and increase trade of American soybeans to Europe. Won a WTO dispute regarding Indonesia’s unfair restriction of U.S. agricultural exports. Defended American Tuna fisherman and packagers before the WTO Opened up Argentina to American pork experts for the first time in a quarter-century American beef exports have returned to china for the first time in more than a decade OK’d up to $12 billion in aid for farmers affected by unfair trade retaliation. Energy Presidential Memorandum to clear roadblocks to construction of the Keystone XL Pipeline. Presidential Memorandum declaring that the Dakota Access Pipeline serves the national interest and initiating the process to complete construction. Opened up the Alaska National Wildlife Refuge to energy exploration. Coal exports up over 60 percent in 2017. Rolled back the “stream protection rule” to prevent it from harming America’s coal industry. Cancelled Obama’s anti-coal Clean Power Plan and proposed the Affordable Clean Energy Rule as a replacement. Withdrew from the job-killing Paris climate agreement, which would have cost the U.S. nearly $3 trillion and led to 6.5 million fewer industrial sector jobs by 2040. U.S. oil production has achieved its highest level in American history United States is now the largest crude oil producer in the world. U.S. has become a net natural gas exporter for the first time in six decades. Action to expedite the identification and extraction of critical minerals that are vital to the nation’s security and economic prosperity. Took action to reform National Ambient Air Quality Standards, benefitting American manufacturers. Rescinded Obama’s hydraulic fracturing rule, which was expected to cost the industry $32 million per year. Proposed an expansion of offshore drilling as part of an all-of-the above energy strategy Held a lease sale for offshore oil and gas leases in the Gulf of Mexico in August 2018. Got EU to increase its imports of liquefied natural gas (LNG) from the United States. Issued permits for the New Burgos Pipeline that will cross the U.S.-Mexico border. Foreign Policy Moved the U.S. Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem. Withdrew from Iran deal and immediately began the process of re-imposing sanctions that had been lifted or waived. Treasury has issued sanctions targeting Iranian activities and entities, including the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps-Qods Force Since enacting sanctions, Iran’s crude exports have fallen off, the value of Iran’s currency has plummeted, and international companies have pulled out of the country. All nuclear-related sanctions will be back in full force by early November 2018. Historic summit with North Korean President Kim Jong-Un, bringing beginnings of peace and denuclearization to the Korean Peninsula. The two leaders have exchanged letters and high-level officials from both sides have met resulting in tremendous progress. North Korea has halted nuclear and missile tests. Negotiated the return of the remains of missing-in-action soldiers from the Korean War. Imposed strong sanctions on Venezuelan dictator Nicholas Maduro and his inner circle. Executive order preventing those in the U.S. from carrying out certain transactions with the Venezuelan regime, including prohibiting the purchase of the regime’s debt. Responded to the use of chemical weapons by the Syrian regime. Rolled out sanctions targeting individuals and entities tied to Syria’s chemical weapons program. Directed strikes in April 2017 against a Syrian airfield used in a chemical weapons attack on innocent civilians. Joined allies in launching airstrikes in April 2018 against targets associated with Syria’s chemical weapons use. New Cuba policy that enhanced compliance with U.S. law and held the Cuban regime accountable for political oppression and human rights abuses. Treasury and State are working to channel economic activity away from the Cuban regime, particularly the military. Changed the rules of engagement, empowering commanders to take the fight to ISIS. ISIS has lost virtually all of its territory, more than half of which has been lost under Trump. ISIS’ self-proclaimed capital city, Raqqah, was liberated in October 2017. All Iraqi territory had been liberated from ISIS. More than a dozen American hostages have been freed from captivity all of the world. Action to combat Russia’s malign activities, including their efforts to undermine the sanctity of United States elections. Expelled dozens of Russian intelligence officers from the United States and ordered the closure of the Russian consulate in Seattle, WA. Banned the use of Kaspersky Labs software on government computers, due to the company’s ties to Russian intelligence. Imposed sanctions against five Russian entities and three individuals for enabling Russia’s military and intelligence units to increase Russia’s offensive cyber capabilities. Sanctions against seven Russian oligarchs, and 12 companies they own or control, who profit from Russia’s destabilizing activities. Sanctioned 100 targets in response to Russia’s occupation of Crimea and aggression in Eastern Ukraine. Enhanced support for Ukraine’s Armed Forces to help Ukraine better defend itself. Helped win U.S. bid for the 2028 Summer Olympics in Los Angeles. Helped win U.S.-Mexico-Canada’s united bid for 2026 World Cup. Defense Executive order keeping the detention facilities at U.S. Naval Station Guantanamo Bay open. $700 billion in military funding for FY 2018 and $716 billion for FY 2019. Largest military pay raise in nearly a decade. Ordered a Nuclear Posture Review to ensure America’s nuclear forces are up to date and serve as a credible deterrent. Released America’s first fully articulated cyber strategy in 15 years. New strategy on national biodefense, which better prepares the nation to defend against biological threats. Administration has announced that it will use whatever means necessary to protect American citizens and servicemen from unjust prosecution by the International Criminal Court. Released an America first National Security Strategy. Put in motion the launch of a Space Force as a new branch of the military and relaunched the National Space Council. Encouraged North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) allies to increase defense spending to their agree-upon levels. In 2017 alone, there was an increase of more than 4.8 percent in defense spending amongst NATO allies. Every member state has increased defense spending. Eight NATO allies will reach the 2 percent benchmark by the end of 2018 and 15 allies are on trade to do so by 2024. NATO allies spent over $42 billion dollars more on defense since 2016. Executive order to help military spouses find employment as their families deploy domestically and abroad. Veterans affairs Signed the VA Accountability Act and expanded VA telehealth services, walk-in-clinics, and same-day urgent primary and mental health care. Delivered more appeals decisions – 81,000 – to veterans in a single year than ever before. Strengthened protections for individuals who come forward and identify programs occurring within the VA. Signed legislation that provided $86.5 billion in funding for the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the largest dollar amount in history for the VA. VA MISSION Act, enacting sweeping reform to the VA system that: Consolidated and strengthened VA community care programs. Funding for the Veterans Choice program. Expanded eligibility for the Family Caregivers Program. Gave veterans more access to walk-in care. Strengthened the VA’s ability to recruit and retain quality healthcare professionals. Enabled the VA to modernize its assets and infrastructure. Signed the VA Choice and Quality Employment Act in 2017, which authorized $2.1 billion in addition funds for the Veterans Choice Program. Worked to shift veterans’ electronic medical records to the same system used by the Department of Defense, a decades old priority. Issued an executive order requiring the Secretaries of Defense, Homeland Security, and Veterans Affairs to submit a joint plan to provide veterans access to access to mental health treatment as they transition to civilian life. Increased transparency and accountability at the VA by launching an online “Access and Quality Tool,” providing veterans with access to wait time and quality of care data. Signed legislation to modernize the claims and appeal process at the VA. Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act, providing enhanced educational benefits to veterans, service members, and their family members. Lifted a 15-year limit on veterans’ access to their educational benefits. Created a White House VA Hotline to help veterans and principally staffed it with veterans and direct family members of veterans. VA employees are being held accountable for poor performance, with more than 4,000 VA employees removed, demoted, and suspended so far. Signed the Veterans Treatment Court Improvement Act, increasing the number of VA employees that can assist justice-involved veterans.

jsklinelga

The writer is correct. And to follow his line of logic an additional question should be asked: What is your immigration status? Visa, work permit etc. etc. That way we could get a handle on the magnitude of the problem backlog and develop better policies for the future.

veritas

Democrat Immigration Dogma: Anyone from anywhere in the world has the God-given right to enter the United States for any reason without encumbrance of any kind from any governmental entity. Once here, "undocumented" aliens are free to seek and gain employment wherever they choose and by any means necessary, including falsifying employment applications and government tax and Social Security forms. If they cannot or will not find work, they are entitled to receive all relevant government-provided goods and services normally reserved for US citizens. Undocumented immigrant families must be granted government provided health care. They must be granted drivers licenses and voting privileges. Their children must be granted residency status for college tuition. If they break the law, they must be provided (at tax payers' expense) legal representation and court translation services. They may not be deported to their home country for any reason (with the possible exception of committing murder). They must not be "pressured" to learn English, profess any allegiance to the US or assimilate to the country in any way. They must be allowed to roam free and unencumbered anywhere in the US and their presence in the country must not be acknowledged or tracked by the US government, specifically by identifying their presence through the national census. Most importantly, any legal US citizen questioning the equity, efficacy or reasonableness of this Dogma will be labeled a hopeless, racist xenophobe.

threecents

Veri, I only read your first three words. I guess we are both lazy.

jsklinelga

Veritas You certainly covered a bunch of talking points or concerns. I agree with the writer. it boggles my mind that people would oppose this question. It is pure politics. I give credit to the writer for their honesty. Something missing within the usual mob mentality.

gabrielshorn2013

After researching previously asked questions, I found the following from 2000 13. Is this person a citizen of the United States? https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/2000_1.html

hayduke2

You fail to mention that your particular reference notes two forms of the census. The short form went to the majority of the US households and DID NOT include the citizenship question. The long form, which went to select households did include that question but it did not go to everyone - a major difference from what is being proposed. Again, posting something that is not accurate and trying to make a case based on it is misleading and disingenous at best. https://www.npr.org/2018/03/27/597436512/fact-check-has-citizenship-been-a-standard-census-question

gabrielshorn2013

Oh come on hay. In that case, any question not found on the short form is invalid. Not true. The long form is to drill down to get information through valid statistical analysis of the results, to make inferences about the entire population. Hardly misleading. Have you ever used statistics in research?

hayduke2

Sorry- but the crux is that the question was to be added for EVERY. form and not just a random sampling for statistical purposes. Defend your view all you want but it is not accurate.

hayduke2

"Most housing units in the country (about 83 percent) will receive the short-form questionnaire in Census 2000. The Census 2000 short form will be the shortest form in 180 years. Five subjects that were on the 1990 census short form have moved to the Census 2000 long form: marital status, units in structure, number of rooms, value of home and monthly rent. The long form can reliably collect this information." Source: https://www.census.gov/dmd/www/pdf/d3239a.pdf

gabrielshorn2013

So, according to you, it is ok for statistical sampling purposes on the long form, but not ok on the short form. I'm still not understanding the rationale of that position. Help me out here.

hayduke2

Seems pretty obvious. In that one census, 17% of eligible households received the long form that contained the question you referenced. It was not to meet the intent of the census, which is to count the number of people in the US. The current efforts involve a politically motivated addition of the question to possibibly discourage accurate results. The difference is clear and the short form of the 2000 census was designed to count people. In 2010, the long form was dropped.

gabrielshorn2013

"The difference is clear and the short form of the 2000 census was designed to count people." Really? then the only question that should have been asked in 2010 was number 1, "How many people were living or staying in this house, apartment, or mobile home on April 1, 2010", which could have been answered on a postcard as described above. Did the Census Bureau need to know, or did the they have the right to ask the following questions from the short form?: 2. Were there any additional people staying here April 1, 2010 that you did not include in Question 1? 3. Is this house, apartment, or mobile home: owned with mortgage, owned without mortgage, rented, occupied without rent? 4. What is your telephone number? 5. Please provide information for each person living here. Start with a person here who owns or rents this house, apartment, or mobile home. If the owner or renter lives somewhere else, start with any adult living here. This will be Person 1. What is Person 1's name? 6. What is Person 1's sex? 7. What is Person 1's age and Date of Birth? 8. Is Person 1 of Hispanic, Latino, or Spanish origin? 9. What is Person 1's race? 10. Does Person 1 sometimes live or stay somewhere else?

hayduke2

Still not making a convincing argument. Sorry. Again, the citizenship question was designed to be used as a political tool. Other questions gather demographic information that can be used to make resource allocation decisions and funding needs. That said, they are intrusive as well. As an aside - "For the 2010 census, the long- and short-form questionnaires used from 1940 to 2000 were replaced by a single questionnaire asking 10 questions. The questions asked by the long-form questionnaire are now asked by the annual American Community Survey." Maybe we'll get to the one question census.

awteam2000

According to the constitution the core purpose of the census is to get a head count of all ‘persons’ residing in the United States. Not to discourage people from filing out the census. Just a simple head count.

marinick1

[thumbup][thumbup]

thump1202

Here's a question. With tech companies and their monitoring of our information, creation of shadow profiles, number and ubiquity of sensors, is the census even required? Google probably has a better count than the US government could ever come up with that has far more demographics attached to it including do you own a gun, gender identification, and your social credit score.

shiftless88

for the conservatives here: replace the "are you a citizen" question with a "do you own a gun" question to see how you like these extraneous questions that a Democratic president could include under your arguments.

frazed

So absurd as to not even be analogous.

armillary

As a second amendment supporter and a gun owner, I support shiftless88's proposal for a gun ownership question on the census. How else are we to ensure that the right to keep and bear arms is ensured than by knowing who owns one? It's perfectly logical!

public-redux

The 2A even protects the constitutional right of illegal immigrants to keep and bear arms. I suppose it would be interesting to know how many illegal immigrants have adapted to American culture by owning guns.

shiftless88

Fazed: There is no reason to ask if someone is a citizen or not so if you can ask that, then you can ask if you own a gun. If you think someone should be able to check "not a citizen" (plenty of legal immigrants fall into this category) with no fear then you should be able to check "I have a gun at home" with no fear, right?

MD1756

There is no reason to ask many of the questions on the Census now. When you collect only partial information you will only get good results by luck. Much of the information is used to actually discriminated for or against defined groups while completely ignoring groups that haven't been defined. MoCo for example uses home ownership gap as a racial equity problem to be solved without looking at some many other factors that impact home ownership. When you look only at race and home ownership you will propose poor "fixes." So either collect more information or reduce the information to what is necessary to establish representation to the Federal government.

threecents

The God-given constitutional right to bear arms without telling the government, even though there can be a quick background check to make sure criminals and crazy people don't get them. No, a lot of Republicans don't want that on the census, and they don't want national registration, even if it would help fight crime. Just increase the prison times...

rikkitikkitavvi

That is a scathingly brilliant idea shifty. Have your department head start printing them up with BOTH questions. Oh......wait.

rikkitikkitavvi

Hey shifty 6:08 comment. We are waiting too. Just for different happenings. Us "bitter clingers" can be VERY patient, when it counts. Gotta have faith sweet pea. Peace be upon you brother.[innocent]

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threecents

We really have no interest in ID-ing everyone of you bible-hugging deplorable. We are just waiting for you all to notice that light you see is from an old flash light.

timothygaydos

great question to have on the census to know exactly or near as we can get to how many citizens we have and where and how many illegals are here in the country... that being said love liberals who state they are trying to protect elections but yet the Obama Admin spied on their party's opponent during 2016 and created chaos during the transition with phony Russian collusion story... dirt will hit the fan soon and then what do liberals do next - that right now it is Harvey turn to give up famous names in the exploitation of young women... down goes Bill Clinton and others...

shiftless88

The purpose of the census is to count how many humans live in the country and where. I figured a strict constitutionalist would agree that the stated reason for the census takes precedence and nothing should be done to reduce the accuracy of that value.

frazed

Counting is the procedure but not the purpose of the census.

shiftless88

The purpose of the census is to get an accurate enumeration of every human person. The reason you want such an accurate enumeration is outline in the Constitution but the underlying issue is that an actual and accurate enumeration is required. Adding a citizenship question will reduce the accuracy. Do you want an inaccurate census, Fazed?

public-redux

Would you agree that an accurate count is integral to the purpose?

threecents

The purpose may be debatable, but Shiftless is correct - the Constitution says the census should be an accurate count of the people in each state. Adding the citizenship question will make the count less accurate. Everyone knows that Trump's decision to try to add the question is reduce the amount of tax dollars that go to areas with a lot of illegal immigrants. I am sure Barr knows the question can not be on the form. I think he went on with this charade to please the Trump base - even though he knows he can accomplish nothing.

MD1756

Adding any question other than the number of people residing at a location reduces the accuracy. Get rid of all questions except the count if you're really a stickler for accuracy.

shiftless88

I am fine with that, though I do not know that there is any evidence for your claim (there is evidence for the inaccuracies created by adding the citizenship question)

MD1756

Shiftless, in another comment I identified where I refused to answer certain questions when I received a long form because I thought it was none of their business and I knew they would use the information to discriminate for or against certain groups. Therefore, my refusal to answer certain questions, decreased their accuracy (other than count) and the other information they collect and use likely has a greater impact on us than the actual count of people does. I suspect some people rather than partially answering the long form and writing why they were not filling it out completely (like I did), probably just threw it out and ignored repeated attempts to collect the information. I certainly ignored the followup attempts to collect the information I refused to give. I figured the information I gave would be used to have my tax dollars go to support policies I disagreed with, so I wasn't going to help them. Since our government in theory operates with the consent of the people, I was saying I do not consent to being taxed to support certain policies.

rikkitikkitavvi

https://www.gop.com/platform/

paulericson

The census is Constitutionally tasked with determining the number of people residing in the United States. At the outset, this accounting clearly included slaves, who had no citizenship rights. Since the number of people, not citizens, determines the allocation of Congressional districts among states it is critical to obtain the most accurate accounting of people residing in each state. Similarly, some federal assistance programs are based on the numbers of residents not citizens. The citizenship question being proposed is a 'nice to have' feature that comes at a cost of significant under-counting of the US population. We should leave well enough alone.

hayduke2

paul - exactly the reason I am against the citizenship question. The census is designed solely to determine how many people are residing in the US. No need to skew results with a politically motivated question of citzenship.

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hayduke2

And that has to do what with the census.. The intent and purpose is to determine the number of people in the US.

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gabrielshorn2013

Hay, if that the only purpose, the census form would be a postcard where you would enter a number from 1 to n, and then mail it back in immediately. No need for any other information. https://www.census.gov/history/www/through_the_decades/index_of_questions/2010.html

threecents

HD2 is correct. The constitution mandates that the number of people in each state be counted. Those without evidence of citizenship will obviously try to avoid being counted if there is a citizenship question. This issue is about as cut and dry as they come. There is no way that a court will allow the question. Barr must know this, so I am wondering what his strategy is.

Comment deleted.
shiftless88

gabe; it IS the only purpose mandated in the Constitution, which is the important bit. Sure, the government likes to piggy back on the census to learn other things, but none of those should ever interfere with the Constitutionally mandated purpose of an accurate counting of peoplel

hayduke2

Thanks for the response shiftless - while I realize that gabe wants to have the last word at times, it is the mandated reason for the census. As far as the postcard, maybe they could put that right on the back of the president's promise that the majority of folks can do their taxes on a postcard.

gabrielshorn2013

Shiftless, so we can ignore those other questions without penalty (see my link above for previous census questions)? No census taker will show up at our doors to do a follow up? If the Census Bureau can ask those questions and still be Constitutional, why can't a citizenship question be asked?

shiftless88

Gabe; as noted THAT question will reduce the accuracy of the count. A proper and full enumeration of all humans living in the states is the purpose of the census and things that decrease the accuracy should not be on there.

thump1202

Have I always gotten a different census form than everyone else? I remember this question being there with a host of demographics. Is this another case of non citizens don't need to put forth the effort citizens do such as meeting real ID requirements to fly or get a driver's license? If not can I save myself some time and get this quick form instead of the full one? I don't see why there needs to be more than a single form type.

public-redux

You may have seen this question on one of the non-decennial surveys done by the Census Bureau. They do a number of studies that rely on statistical samples of the population. The last time citizenship was on the decennial census was 1950.

thump1202

That must have been it, sure looked like a regular census form with the fill this out truthfully or we'll lock you up disclaimer! Interesting verbage for a so called confidential form.

MD1756

Each decennial they have two questionnaires. I got the long one once (I believe the long form was ended in 2010), and I refused to answer all of their questions. It was none of their business knowing my income and some of the other questions they asked.

public-redux

Thank you.

gabrielshorn2013

Public, as I discovered and posted above, it was question 13 in 2000.

public-redux

Our household has been selected twice for Census Bureau surveys in the last 15ish years.

gary4books

The census is every ten years and should be special and also non-partisan. we have so many ways to measure citizenship that we can afford to keep the census special and safe for all who respond. The3 citizenship question can be asked on social media, in interactive web pages and even in the media. It is not a necessary part of the census.

DickD

A hidden agenda?

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rikkitikkitavvi

You are projecting stoney. And you know it.

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hayduke2

See paulericson Jul 9, 2019 7:44am comment for a reasoned answer why the citizenship question is not needed.

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marinick1

[thumbup][thumbup]

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hayduke2

And here I thought it was healthcare for all citizens, infrastructure improvements, comprehensive immigration reform, equal pay for men and women, retraining manufacturing workers to succeed in the current job markets, addressing climate change and its impacts,ensuring clean air and water, and addressing our long term energy needs to name a few of the platform planks.

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KR999

Well put rikki. [thumbup][thumbup][thumbup]

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DickD

I mean the writer, I don't believe what is said here.

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frazed

[thumbup]

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threecents

Conservatives put Trump in office, so...

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