From the outset, I’ve recommended that we all get our health news from qualified experts, not politicians or TV news pundits. A global pandemic is serious, even though the rate of recovery from this virus strain is high. The worst outcomes for the most vulnerable populations are around 15 percent, meaning that 85 percent of those affected in the worst possible way are surviving. Use the resources of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or the Frederick County Health Department as your trusted sources of COVID-19 information.

That said, we just don’t know enough about the spread of COVID-19 to diminish our concern or risk accelerating the reach of this virus. So our national, state and local elected leaders are doing their best to try to mandate controls over human movement in order to flatten out the curve of “community spread.”

It’s a scary time, a situation where a lack of knowledge creates a vacuum, and fear and ignorance will always fill a vacuum of truth.

Instead of focusing on the things we have no control over, my hope is that the Frederick County business community sees this for what it offers us, not what it denies us.

My guiding principle in situations like this is to focus on where we’ll be after the incident is resolved. Even in the worst-case scenario we’ve heard described, the duration of this event will likely be measured in weeks or months, not years.

What will you learn about yourself, your customers, your services and your workplace during this time when we sell less, make less and produce less than we normally do?

Here at the chamber, for example, we’ll be analyzing all of our services and programs to see what changes we can make to our processes to take better advantage of online resources. Can we substitute in-person meetings with high-quality digital content? Can we reach folks at their service counter more effectively than we can teach them by coming to the chamber office? Are there outdated, less-effective programs that need retirement/replacement with more current messaging?

If we’re not using this time of confusion and fear to instead focus on our core business, our essential personnel and the needs/demands of our customers (in this case current and prospective chamber members), then all we’ve accomplished is to cower in fear of a thing we don’t understand and cannot control.

That, my friends, is not leadership. In fact, that is the total absence of leadership.

So while hoarders buy up toilet paper, I’m hoping my friends in the private, public and nonprofit sectors use this “forced pause” to strategically examine who they serve, and how best to serve them. A restaurant might take this time to ensure that online ordering and carryout or delivery services are operating at peak efficiency. Health clubs, hotels, and health facilities can update internal cleaning/sanitizing processes that reflect the latest and safest products and practices. Auto repair shops can focus on vehicle exchange processes that minimize human interactions between customer and technicians while emphasizing the transfer of necessary information. Almost every single business can take some time to assess/reassess our outward-facing brand, making sure that we’re communicating the most important messages in the most impactful manner.

No matter the line of work, all of us can turn our attention to our internal processes and practices, to shift from fear to focus.

Once we do that, then the next step is to communicate. Our internal process improvements can then be used to boost the confidence of our current and prospective customers by strategically communicating those changes. That means that you get to use your strategic efforts to strengthen your core business to build your customer base, turning a negative into a true business marketing strategy.

By their nature, leaders are resourceful, creative, persistent and resilient. Here in Frederick County, those leadership characteristics are demonstrated in the halls of government, the offices of our nonprofits, and in businesses large and small. Let’s use this time to get better and to prepare for the inevitable recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic.

(9) comments

francesca_easa

Excellent commentary. A good reminder that not only businesses but people should have alternate plans in place.

DickD

The survival rate is 99%, not 85%. But that is bad too, because their is a potential of 3,500,000 deaths. That number is high because only 70 - 170,000 are likely to catch the virus.

shiftless88

Mortality rate overall so far is about 3%, so survival rate would be 97% (depending on your age and health, of course)

MD1756

Dick, re-read the letter. The 85% is for the most vulnerable portion or the general population (older people). So your calculation of deaths would be low if everyone were to get the virus.

Piedmontgardener

I think after this over, there will be a vastly different way we view work and the employment contract. If we don't consider our employees as a part of our extended family, we've made the first mistake. And people will have long memories of being put into harm's way down the line.

Obadiah Plainsmen

Agreed, If employers would treat and respect employees as part of their own family , there would be no need for unions.

francesca_easa

I second that Gardener!

jsklinelga

Positive letter. You have a demanding task. From a consumer's point of view I think real time information on the spread of the virus, testing availability and other relevant information would greatly aid the business community. The better the information stream the less business is lost through the fear of the unknown.

shiftless88

If our President's administration hadn't screwed the pooch on testing we would have a lot more information similar to other countries. As it is, there just are not enough tests to know where the virus is spreading so we have to act as if it is everywhere (or it will be everywhere).

Welcome to the discussion.

Keep it clean. No vulgar, racist, sexist or sexually-oriented language.
Engage ideas. This forum is for the exchange of ideas, not personal attacks or ad hominem criticisms.br/> TURN OFF CAPS LOCK.
Be civil. Don't threaten. Don't lie. Don't bait. Don't degrade others.
No trolling. Stay on topic.
No spamming. This is not the place to sell miracle cures.
No deceptive names. Apparently misleading usernames are not allowed.
Say it once. No repetitive posts, please.
Help us. Use the 'Report' link for abusive posts.