Iraq's top cleric calls for deal on PM

Associated Press A burned police truck is left behind Friday in the northern Iraqi city of Mosul. It has been two weeks since the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant took over the country's second-largest city.

BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq’s top Shiite cleric stepped up the pressure Friday on politicians to agree on Iraq’s next prime minister, after incumbent Nouri al-Maliki lost the confidence of former allies in the fight against Sunni militants.

The appeal by Grand Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani comes as al-Maliki is fighting to keep his job, with even key patron Iran exploring alternatives in the face of Iraq’s worst crisis since U.S. troops withdrew at the end of 2011.

The conflict has drawn the Americans back to Iraq with special forces being deployed to help Iraqi troops. The U.S. has also started flying armed drones over Baghdad to protect U.S. interests in the Iraqi capital, a Pentagon official said Friday. He spoke on the condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to discuss the new flights on the record.

Al-Maliki, who has governed the country since 2006, needs support from other parties after his State of Law bloc won the most seats in the elections but failed to gain the majority needed to govern alone. That set the stage for potentially months of coalition negotiations. But now a new government is wanted urgently to face the lightning advance across the north and west of the country by the al-Qaida breakaway Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant.

The stunning gains were made possible in large part because Iraqi security forces melted away in the face of the onslaught.

Human Rights Watch released a report Friday about the killings of scores of police and soldiers by the Sunni militants in the days after it captured the northern city of Mosul on June 10, then stormed south to capture Saddam Hussein’s hometown of Tikrit.

The killings were widely reported after the Islamic State posted graphic, online photos showing dozens of men wearing civilian clothes lined up and bent over as militants pointed rifles at them from behind. A final set of photos shows bodies.

Human Rights Watch said that based on analysis of the photos and satellite imagery, the militants killed between 160 to 190 men in two locations in Tikrit between June 11 and June 14.

“The number of victims may well be much higher, but the difficulty of locating bodies and accessing the area has prevented a full investigation,” the group said.

Human Rights Watch said it used satellite imagery from 2013 and publicly available photos taken earlier to pinpoint the site of the killings in a field next to the Tigris River and near one of Saddam’s former palaces. It said satellite imagery of the site from June 16 did not reveal bodies but showed indications of earth movement consistent with the two shallow trenches visible in the photos, in which the soldiers were forced to lie down before being shot.

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